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Federal Acquisition Requirements

What is EPEAT?

The Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT®) is a registry of electronic products that are declared to meet voluntary environmental performance criteria set forth in standards developed through open, consensus-based processes. EPEAT uses manufacturer self-declaration and a post-declaration verification system to govern the listing of products on the registry. Products listed on the active EPEAT registry are "EPEAT-registered" at one of three tiers – Bronze, Silver or Gold – depending on their declared environmental performance.

EPEAT is managed by a non-governmental third party; the Green Electronics Council.

What is ENERGY STAR?

ENERGY STAR® is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) program that helps businesses and individuals save money and protect the climate through superior energy efficiency. Energy-using products can earn the ENERGY STAR label by meeting energy efficiency requirements set forth in ENERGY STAR product specifications. Products must be tested in an EPA recognized laboratory and reviewed by an EPA recognized certification body prior to earning the label. Products that are certified as meeting the requirements set forth by the ENERGY STAR program are listed as "ENERGY STAR certified."

The ENERGY STAR program covers a wide variety of product categories in addition to office electronics and data center products. ENERGY STAR also has energy efficiency programs aimed at homes and commercial and industrial buildings.

What is FEMP?

The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies in meeting energy-related goals and providing energy leadership to the country. FEMP identifies energy-efficient product efficiency levels for Federal purchases. These products are either FEMP-designated or have an applicable ENERGY STAR specification. FEMP also provides guidance for meeting Federal low standby power requirements for products.

FEMP covers a wide variety of product categories in addition to office and data center electronics. FEMP also has programs aimed at sustainable public and commercial buildings and campuses, water efficiency, and Federal fleets.

What is the difference between FEMP-designated products and low standby power products?

FEMP manages two product procurement programs that cover energy-using products: 1) Energy Efficient Product Procurement; and 2) Low Standby Power Product Procurement.

The Energy Efficient Product Procurement program identifies and sets specifications for FEMP-designated product categories (such as Chillers, Lighting, Water-Cooled Ice Machines). Electronics and IT product categories (such as Computers, Displays and Servers) are not designated by FEMP requirements but rather by ENERGY STAR specifications.

The Low Standby Power Product Procurement program identifies products meeting Federal low standby power requirements, which are required for all energy-using product categories. For most electronics, EPEAT-registered and ENERGY STAR certified products meet low standby power requirements. These registered and certified products are not included on the FEMP Low Standby Power Product List, as they are assumed to be in compliance. Exceptions are EPEAT-registered and ENERGY STAR certified thin client and workstation computers, which are NOT assumed to meet low standby power requirements. FEMP uses the Product List to highlight product compliance in these two high-priority product categories for which low standby power requirements are not met by products that are EPEAT-registered or ENERGY STAR certified.

What are the Federal requirements for electronics acquisitions?

All applicable acquisitions must be:
  • Environmentally preferable products or services that meet or exceed specifications, standards, or labels recommended by EPA (for example, EPEAT-registered).
  • ENERGY STAR certified products.
  • Products meeting Federal low standby power specifications.

"Applicable acquisitions" are product categories that are listed on the EPEAT registry, have an ENERGY STAR specification, or any energy-consuming product (for low standby power requirements).

Where are the Federal requirements for electronics acquisitions?

Additionally, for Department of Energy sites:

o Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) Subpart 923.1

Other Federal agencies should contact their sustainable acquisition and/or electronics stewardship point of contact for information on other agency-applicable regulation, policy and guidance.


Product Coverage

What electronics are covered by EPEAT, ENERGY STAR and low standby power requirements?

Product Category

Included Product Types

EPEAT

ENERGY STAR

Low Standby Power

Audio/Video Equipment

·         Home-theater-in-a-box systems

·         Soundbars

·         Portable music player speaker docks

·         Audio amplifiers, speakers, and subwoofers

·         AV receivers

·         Shelf systems

·         CD players

·         Blu-ray Disc players

·         DVD players

·         Digital media players

No

Yes

Yes

Computers

·         Desktops

·         Integrated desktop and thin client computers (All-in-Ones)

·         Thin clients

·         Workstations

·         Notebooks (including Two-in-Ones and mobile thin clients)

·         Portable All-In-One Computers

·         Slates/Tablets

·         Small-scale ("desktop") servers

Yes; excludes small-scale ("desktop") servers

Yes

Yes

Telephones

·         Corded (AC power) and Cordless Phones

·         Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) Phones

No

Yes

Yes

Data Center Storage

 

·         See ENERGY STAR specification for complete definition

No

Yes

Yes

Displays

·         Monitors (including 3D displays, touchscreens)

·         Signage displays

·         Professional displays

Yes

Yes

Yes

Enterprise Servers

 

·         Blade-, multi-node, rack-mounted, or pedestal form factor computer servers with no more than four processor sockets in the computer server (or per blade or node)

No

Yes

Yes

Imaging Equipment

·         Copiers

·         Digital duplicators

·         Fax machines

·         Mailing machines

·         Printers (including plotters and other non-handheld specialty printers)

·         Scanners

·         Multifunction (MFD) and All-in-One (AIO) devices/products

Yes

Yes

Yes

Mobile Devices

·         Mobile phones

Yes

No

No

Set-Top and Cable Boxes

·         Cable, satellite, Internet Protocol or other Set-Top and Cable Boxes

No

Yes

Yes

Large and Small Network Equipment

 

·        See ENERGY STAR specification for complete definition

No

Yes

Yes

Televisions

·         TVs

·         Hospitality TVs

Yes

Yes

Yes

Uninterruptable Power Supplies (UPSs)

·        Passive, Offline and Standby UPSs

·         Line interactive UPSs

·         Online, continuous and double conversion UPSs

No

Yes

Yes

 

FEMP also provides broader Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs.

What electronics are not currently covered by EPEAT, ENERGY STAR and low standby power requirements?

  • Peripherals, except those sold with covered products
  • Printers and scanners that are battery operated (handheld)
  • Projectors
  • Whiteboards (digital)
  • Zero/ultrathin clients

Where can I check on more specific product exclusions?

The standards used by EPEAT define the product coverage for each applicable standard. The IEEE 1680 Family of Standards and UL 110 Standard have specific definitions for each covered product under the "Definitions" sections. These standards are not freely available to the public and must be purchased through IEEE or UL.

For questions regarding EPEAT product exclusions:

Department of Energy employees and contractors may contact Cate Berard in the Office of Sustainable Environmental Stewardship (cate.berard@hq.doe.gov; 202-586-2334).

Other Federal agency employees and contractors should contact their sustainable acquisition and/or electronics stewardship point of contact, or may contact Holly Elwood at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (elwood.holly@epa.gov; 202-564-8854).

ENERGY STAR specifications have exceptions for all of their covered product definitions. Product specifications can be viewed for each product:

  • Go to the ENERGY STAR product web page;
  • Click the link for a product category;
  • Click on the "For Partners" link to the right of the product header;
  • On the "Current" tab, click on the link for the Requirements document; and
  • Navigate the document to read the "Definitions," "Included Products," and "Excluded Products" sections.

For questions regarding ENERGY STAR product exclusions:

Department of Energy employees and contractors may contact Cate Berard in the Office of Sustainable Environmental Stewardship (cate.berard@hq.doe.gov; 202-586-2334).

Other Federal agency employees and contractors should contact their sustainable acquisition and/or electronics stewardship point of contact, or may contact Steve Ryan at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (ryan.steve@epa.gov; 202-343-9123).

Federal low standby requirements apply to all energy-consuming products. Federal agencies must buy products that consume only 1 watt of standby power or, where such a product is not available, the lowest available standby power consumption.

Are EPEAT-registered products also ENERGY STAR certified?

All EPEAT-registered products are required to meet the technical specifications of the applicable ENERGY STAR specification but are not required to actually be ENERGY STAR certified.

Federal purchasers must ensure that products that are EPEAT-registered are also ENERGY STAR certified. Simply purchasing EPEAT-registered products is not sufficient to meet Federal requirements.

Do EPEAT-registered products meet low standby power requirements?

For imaging equipment, EPEAT-registered products must meet a low standby criterion. This requirement is consistent with Federal procurement requirements overseen by FEMP. Therefore, EPEAT-registered imaging equipment meets FEMP low standby power requirements.

In contrast, thin clients and workstation computers are not required to meet a low standby threshold. As a result, these EPEAT-registered products do not automatically meet Federal low standby power requirements. Federal purchasers must ensure that these EPEAT-registered products are also listed as "compliant" on the Low Standby Power Product List.

EPEAT-registered desktops, integrated computers, notebooks, displays and televisions do not have required low standby criteria but do meet Federal low standby power requirements because they are required to meet the ENERGY STAR technical specifications. Federal purchase of ENERGY STAR certified products for these categories is sufficient for meeting Federal low standby power procurement requirements.

Do ENERGY STAR certified products meet low standby power requirements?

With the exception of thin clients and workstation computers, ENERGY STAR certified electronic and IT products meet Federal low standby power requirements.


Product Definitions

What are the differences between slates/tablets, Two-In-One notebooks, and portable All-In-One computers?

Slates and tablets are computing devices designed for portability that include an integrated display; lack an integrated, physically attached keyboard; primarily rely on touchscreen input (but may have an optional keyboard); primarily rely on a wireless network connection (e.g., Wi-Fi, 3G, etc.); and are primarily powered by an internal battery.

Two-In-One notebooks resemble a traditional notebook with a clam shell form factor, but have a detachable display which can act as an independent slate/tablet when disconnected.

Portable All-In-One computers are computing devices designed for limited portability that include an integrated display; lack a keyboard integrated into the physical housing of the product; primarily rely on touchscreen input; include a wireless network connection; and include an internal battery, but are primarily powered by connection to the AC mains.

Slates/Tablets, Two-in-One notebooks and portable All-in-One computers are covered by EPEAT and the ENERGY STAR Computer specification.

What is the difference between thin clients and ultrathin/zero clients?

Thin clients are independently powered computers that rely on a connection to remote computing resources (such as a server) to obtain primary functionality.

Ultrathin or zero clients have the same features as thin clients. However, ultrathin/zero clients only send raw mouse and keyboard input to a remote computing resource and receive back raw video from the remote computing resource.

Thin clients are covered by EPEAT and the ENERGY STAR Computer specification. Ultrathin/zero clients are not currently covered by either program. Confirm how the client operates to determine if the product can and should be EPEAT-registered and ENERGY STAR certified.

What is the difference between a small-scale or desktop server and an enterprise server?

A small-scale server is designed in a pedestal, tower, or other form factor similar to those of desktop computers such that all data processing, storage and network interfacing is contained within one box/product. Small-scale servers are designed to perform functions such as providing network infrastructure services (e.g., archiving) and hosting data/media. These products are not designed to process information for other systems or run web servers as a primary function.

An enterprise server provides services and manages networked resources for client devices (e.g., desktop computers, notebook computers, thin clients, wireless devices, PDAs, IP telephones, other computer servers, or other network devices). These servers are sold through enterprise channels for use in data centers and office/corporate environments. Enterprise servers are primarily accessed via network connections versus directly connected user input devices such as a keyboard or mouse.

Small-scale servers are covered under the ENERGY STAR Computer specification. Enterprise servers are covered under the ENERGY STAR Enterprise Server specification. Additional clarifications and restrictions on what products are covered are included in these specifications. EPEAT does not currently cover either product.

What is the difference between a monitor display and signage display?

A monitor display is intended for one person to view in a desk based environment.

A signage display is intended to be viewed by multiple people in non-desk based environments, such as conference rooms or classrooms, retail or department stores, restaurants, museums, hotels, outdoor venues, and airports.

Monitors and signage displays are covered by both EPEAT and the ENERGY STAR Display specification.

What is the difference between small network equipment and large network equipment?

Network equipment, in general, is a device whose primary function is to pass Internet Protocol traffic among various network interfaces/ports.

Small Network Equipment is designed for stationary operation; contains no more than eleven (11) wired physical network ports; and is configured for operation outside of standard equipment racks.

Large Network Equipment is rack-mounted; intended for use in standard equipment racks; and/or contains more than eleven (11) wired physical network ports.

Additional clarifications and restrictions on what products are covered are included in the ENERGY STAR Small Network Equipment and Large Network Equipment specifications. EPEAT does not currently cover this equipment.

What specialty equipment is covered by monitor requirements?

ENERGY STAR specifications and the standards used by EPEAT do not specifically itemize specialty equipment that falls within the scope of these programs. In general, if a product meets the included product definition in the relevant specification or standard, and is not specifically excluded, it can be ENERGY STAR certified and EPEAT-registered.

Both 3D monitors and touchscreen displays have been ENERGY STAR certified and EPEAT-registered.

Additional clarifications and restrictions on what products are covered displays are included in the IEEE 1680.1 Standard and ENERGY STAR Display specification.

What specialty equipment is covered by printer requirements?

ENERGY STAR specifications and the standards used by EPEAT do not specifically itemize specialty equipment that falls within the scope of these programs. In general, if a product meets the included product definition in the relevant specification or standard, and is not specifically excluded, it can be ENERGY STAR certified and EPEAT-registered.

Large format printers (plotters), photo printers, and non-handheld label printers have been ENERGY STAR certified and EPEAT-registered.

Battery-operated, handheld printers (many label printers) are not covered by imaging equipment requirements. Products that are designed to operate directly on three-phase power are also not covered by imaging equipment requirements.

Additional clarifications and restrictions on what products are covered printers are included in the IEEE 1680.2 Standard and ENERGY STAR Imaging Equipment specification.

What types of scanners are covered by imaging equipment requirements?

Scanners are defined as devices for converting paper originals into electronic images that can be stored, edited, converted, or transmitted, primarily in a personal computing environment. Covered scanners are capable of being powered from a wall outlet or from a data or network connection.

Battery-operated, handheld scanners (many bar code scanners) are not covered by imaging equipment requirements. Products that are designed to operate directly on three-phase power are also not covered by imaging equipment requirements.

Additional clarifications and restrictions on what products are covered scanners are included in the IEEE 1680.2 Standard and ENERGY STAR Imaging Equipment specification.

What is an integrated or All-in-One computer?

An integrated or All-in-One computer is a desktop or thin client computer in which the computing hardware and display are integrated into a single housing and which is connected to AC mains power through a single cable.

Many integrated computers in the marketplace provide touchscreen interfaces for the display, although this functionality is not specifically included or excluded in the ENERGY STAR or EPEAT product definitions.

Additional clarifications and restrictions on what products are covered integrated computers are included in the IEEE 1680.1 Standard and ENERGY STAR Computer specification.

What is a workstation?

A workstation is a high-performance, single-user computer typically used for graphics, CAD, software development, financial and scientific applications or other computer intensive tasks.

Additional clarifications and restrictions on what products are covered workstations are included in the IEEE 1680.1 Standard and ENERGY STAR Computer specification.

What is a multifunction or All-in-One device (imaging equipment)?

A multifunction device (MFD), multifunction product (MFP) or All-in-One (AIO) device performs two or more of the core functions of a printer, scanner, copier, or fax machine. An MFD may have a physically integrated form factor, or it may consist of a combination of functionally integrated components. MFD copy functionality is considered to be distinct from single-sheet convenience copying functionality sometimes offered by fax machines.

What is a hospitality TV?

A hospitality TV includes bi-directional communications and uses hospitality protocol software, such as video on demand; non-video hotel services or hospitality-specific applications.


Compliant Products Lists

Where can I find the compliant product lists?

In what order should I check the product lists?

Use the following table to determine your product type, and the products lists you must check.

Electronic Product Categories Thin client, and workstation computers Desktop, integrated computers, notebook computers, slates/tablets, displays, imaging equipment, and televisions All other office and data center electronics
How To Comply Purchase products on FEMP's Low Standby Power Product List and that are EPEAT-registered. Purchase products that are EPEAT-registered and ENERGY STAR-certified. Purchase products that are ENERGY STAR-certified.

Where do these programs obtain their data for their product lists?

EPEAT obtains their Registry data from manufacturer product declarations. Some of the data is required, and some of the data is optional. This data is verified, randomly, through an ongoing, post-declaration verification process.

Manufacturers obtain written ENERGY STAR certification from a Certification Body recognized by EPA for the product in question. As part of this certification process, products must be tested in a laboratory recognized by EPA. ENERGY STAR compiles their Certified Product List data from the recognized Certification Bodies, not the manufacturers.

FEMP obtains their Low Standby Power Product List data from the applicable ENERGY STAR Certified Product Lists.

Why are some fields not populated in product list details?

Some of the fields on the product lists are not required data per the applicable standard or specification. As such, some manufacturers may choose to leave these fields blank when submitting their product for ENERGY STAR certification or EPEAT registration.

For ENERGY STAR, these fields are generally limited to "additional information" fields, or fields that are not applicable for the product type. For EPEAT, there are a number of fields that may be blank as EPEAT can only require the submission of data that is required by the performance standards. While EPEAT may request additional information that may be of use to purchasers, such as monitor size or UPC code, these fields are optional and some manufacturers choose not to submit this data.

How often are product lists updated?

EPEAT Registry data can be revised by participating manufacturers at any time, including revision of specific criteria declarations, changing of product names, or removal of products from the Registry. Additionally, verification activities may result in Registry changes when products or manufacturers are found to be in non-conformance with specific criteria or the listed product performance tier (Bronze, Silver or Gold).

ENERGY STAR Certified Product Lists are updated at least once a week.

The FEMP Low Standby Power Product List is updated monthly.

Why would a product be removed from a list?

EPEAT, ENERGY STAR and FEMP do not provide reasons for why a previously listed product is no longer listed. Common reasons for delisting include:

  • Product no longer meets program or product requirements;
  • Verification processes uncovered noncompliance;
  • Manufacturer voluntarily removed the product; and
  • Manufacturer renamed product lines or manufacturer is no longer manufacturing that product.

What do I do if something is not on the program lists, but other sources indicate that the product is EPEAT-registered, ENERGY STAR-certified and/or meets low standby power requirements?

The EPEAT Registry, ENERGY STAR Certified Product Lists and Low Standby Power Product List are the definitive sources for compliant products. Products must be on the applicable list as EPEAT-registered, ENERGY STAR certified and compliant with low standby power requirements at the time of purchase - that is, when an order is placed with manufacturer, retailer or reseller.   There may be instances where a product is not yet on the ENERGY STAR certified product list but the product is certified. EPA allows manufacturers to label their products as ENERGY STAR once they receive written confirmation from an EPA recognized certification body that their product has earned the ENERGY STAR.

While EPEAT, ENERGY STAR and FEMP provide data feeds on compliant products to various governmental and non-governmental vendors, these feeds are not always used or accessible to all retailers and resellers. For sellers without feeds, many manufacturers "set it and forget it" on retailer or reseller websites and catalogues. Some manufacturers have been found to have mislabeled products on their own websites.

What is covered by the "Exceptions" field in the EPEAT Product Registry?

The Exceptions field in the EPEAT Product Registry allows a manufacturer to specify product configurations or model types within a registered product family that may not meet EPEAT requirements. This field is used almost exclusively to cite product configurations that do not meet ENERGY STAR requirements and therefore cannot be EPEAT-registered.

If we confirm a piece of equipment uses 1 watt or less in standby mode, can that product be counted as in compliance?

It depends.

If the product is in one of the categories included in the Low Standby Power Product List (thin clients, workstations) - then the Product List is the only definitive source of determining product compliance.

If the product is not in one of the categories included in the Low Standby Power Product List, but it is a product covered by EPEAT and/or ENERGY STAR, then purchasers must rely on active EPEAT registration or ENERGY STAR certification to confirm product compliance.

For all other products, purchasers must rely on manufacturer data and claims of low standby power levels.


Tracking and Reporting

When should I record that a product we are purchasing is compliant?

Products must be on the applicable product list as EPEAT-registered, ENERGY STAR certified and compliant with low standby power requirements at the time of purchase - that is, when an order is placed with manufacturer, retailer or reseller.

How should I record that a product we are purchasing is compliant?

Save a time-date stamped screenshot or printout of the compliance information from the EPEAT Registry, ENERGY STAR Certified Product Lists and/or Low Standby Power Product List (whichever are applicable).

How can I check on formerly compliant products?

For the purposes of compliance and reporting, products count as EPEAT-registered if they had an Active registration at the time of acquisition. To determine this, you may check the Registration Date and Product Status for a product in the EPEAT Registry:

  • Go to the EPEAT Registry Search page;
  • Click on the "Full Search" button;
  • Select the appropriate options - be sure to select "Active and Archived Products" or "Archived Products Only" under "Product Status" if you are looking for archived products;
  • Click the "Search" button; and
  • Click on a product name link to view the registration details.

For the purposes of compliance and reporting, products count as EPEAT registered if they currently have an Active registration and the purchase date is after the registration date; or they are currently Archived, but the purchase date falls between the registration date and archive date.

For the purposes of compliance and reporting, products count as ENERGY STAR certified if they were on the applicable Certified Product List at the time of acquisition. ENERGY STAR provides lists of products that were certified prior to the specification changes, for some product categories:

  • Go to the ENERGY STAR product web page;
  • Click the link for a product category;
  • Click on the "For Partners" link to the right of the product header; and
  • On the "Archived" tab, click on the link for the Historical List.

FEMP does not maintain a list of previously compliant products.

Can I rely on the archived list of products to confirm my product purchase was compliant?

No. While this data is available, you should not rely on it to determine if a product purchase was compliant.

Archived products lists are not managed with the same rigor as the active product lists. Additionally, the ENERGY STAR Historical List only includes products that were certified at the time the specification changed. It does not include products that may have been certified and then removed prior to the specification change.

It is best to check and record product status at the time of purchase - in the EPEAT Active Registry and ENERGY STAR Product Finder.

How do I report on electronics acquisition activities?

Reporting on electronics acquisitions varies by Federal Agency:

For Department of Energy sites:

Sites are expected to report on the electronics acquisition activities through the Sustainability Dashboard.

A Section in the Sustainability Dashboard covers reporting for electronics acquisition. Sites are expected to report on their annual purchases, in units, for the following product categories:

    Computers
             Desktop
             Integrated Desktop
             Notebook
             Tablets/Slates
             Thin Clients
             Workstations
    Displays
             Monitors
             Signage
    Imaging Equipment
             Copiers
             Digital Duplicators
             Fax Machines
             Mailing Machines
             Multifunction Devices
             Printers
             Scanners
    Televisions

For each product category, sites must report on the following:

  • Total number acquired
  • Number EPEAT Bronze registered
  • Number EPEAT Silver registered
  • Number EPEAT Gold registered
  • Number of ENERGY STAR certified
  • Number with Other Certifications

For additional guidance, please see the Sustainability Dashboard User Guide.

For all Federal agencies:

Contact your sustainable acquisition and/or electronics stewardship point of contact for guidance on reporting.

How will I know when future products have been added to the EPEAT Registry, ENERGY STAR Certified Product List and Low Standby Power Product List?

For updates on the EPEAT program, subscribe to one or more of their RSS or XML News Feeds.

To stay up to date on new ENERGY STAR product categories, subscribe to the RSS feed.

Additionally, periodically check the ENERGY STAR specification development page. On a quarterly basis, ENERGY STAR posts a document that summarizes the status of product specification revisions and new product specifications.

FEMP offers e-mail updates covering energy-efficient product procurement requirements, guidance, and assistance.


Exceptions & Exemptions

What exemptions are allowed to purchasing requirements?

Purchasers may acquire products not meeting sustainable acquisition requirements for any of the following reasons:

  1. Product cannot be acquired competitively within a reasonable performance schedule;
  2. Product cannot be acquired that meets reasonable performance requirements;
  3. Product cannot be acquired at a reasonable price.
  4. An exception is provided by statute, such as the exception to procuring ENERGY STAR or FEMP-designated products under 42 U.S.C. § 8259b(b)(2).

Collectively, these reasons are known as CAP (Cost, Availability, and Performance). Each site makes the determination that a CAP reason exists, and then they may make an exception to purchasing a product meeting sustainable acquisition requirements.

Note that Federal purchasers may assume that ENERGY STAR–certified products and products meeting Federal low standby power requirements are life cycle cost effective. Purchasers, who need to determine whether a covered product is life-cycle cost effective, should rely on the life-cycle cost analysis method in Part 436, Subpart A of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. There is a cost effectiveness example on the FEMP website.

How do I record an exception?

Maintaining a written record of exceptions to EPEAT, ENERGY STAR, and FEMP requirements is required under the Federal Acquisition Regulation:

For the Department of Energy, DOE has a template for recording an exception.

Other Federal agencies should contact their sustainable acquisition and/or electronics stewardship point of contact for further information on documentation of exceptions.

What can I do if I am having trouble finding a compliant specialty product?

Specialty products can be found on all the products lists. Check the product lists before assuming there are no compliant products!

Specialty products are not often identified on the product lists as such. You may need to check the product name or model details to determine if a registered product has the features you need. Alternatively, it may be easier to research the specialty product on manufacturers' websites and then return to the product lists to verify compliance with environmental labeling claims on these sites.

You may need to be creative in searching for a product that meets your needs. For instance, a large monitor may be listed as a signage display or could be swapped for a computer-enabled television.

It is important to note that compliant large monitors and displays, and compliant specialty imaging equipment, are rare. Please see the information on allowable exceptions.

Can I purchase compliant refurbished electronic products?

EPEAT allows registration of refurbished equipment. Currently, no third-party refurbished products have been registered. Manufacturers may sell internally refurbished products as EPEAT-registered, if the product is considered to be a registered model or within a family of registered products and the product still meets all the registration requirements.

ENERGY STAR and FEMP do not cover refurbished office and data center electronics.

Document your need for refurbished equipment at time of purchase and consider including the calculated benefit of reusing equipment, using the Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (click on "Benefits Calculator" tab).

Federal Electronics Recycling

What options are available for recycling of used Federal electronics?

Used electronics that are broken or obsolete and which have been declared for abandonment and destruction should be disposed of through:

How can DOE sites obtain more information about participating in USPS BlueEarth?

DOE has a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the USPS which allows DOE sites and employees to use the USPSBlueEarth Federal Recycling Program, which uses appropriately certified recycling facilities.

DOE sites that need additional information on using the USPS BlueEarth Federal Recycling Program can contact the Sustainability Performance Office at sustainability@hq.doe.gov or the USPS Federal Solutions Specialist who works with DOE: Katrina Raysor; 202-603-0986; Katrina.R.Raysor@usps.gov

Other Federal agencies have similar MOUs with the USPS that allows their use of the USPS BlueEarth Federal Recycling Program. Contact your property management office and/or electronics stewardship point of contact for further information.

What third party certification is an electronics recycler required to have to meet Federal requirements?

The only third party certification programs currently recognized for disposal of Federal electronics in accordance with Federal requirements are 1) the Responsible Recycling (R2) Practices for Use in Accredited Certification Programs for Electronics Recyclers and 2) the e-Stewards Standard for Responsible Recycling and Reuse of Electronic Equipment®.

Both the USPS BlueEarth program and UNICOR use appropriately third party certified recycling facilities. Note that not all UNICOR collection facilities are certified (and are not required to be), but all of the UNICOR recycling facilities are appropriately certified.

Other electronics recyclers must be currently certified to R2 or e-Stewards. For the purposes of third party certification, either accreditation program is sufficient. Some recyclers are certified to only one, and some are certified to both. Both certifications are not necessary, but at least one is.

How can we find a certified recycler?

EPA has recently warned Federal agencies of at least one electronics recycler that has fraudulently presented a forged R2 certification certificate in order to win an electronics recycling contract. All buyers of electronics recycling services should verify that the certifications are real by checking the R2 and e-Stewards lists of certified recyclers.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has an interactive map that consolidates information obtained from e-Stewards® and R2 Practices on currently certified recyclers. This map may be used to search for and find electronics refurbishing and recycling facilities certified to either or both of these voluntary, non-federal standards. The indicators on the map generally mark the location of the facility. Inclusion of facilities on this map is for informational purposes only. EPA does not endorse any of these facilities or their services.

The EPA map provides a method for searching for facilities certified to either or both e-Stewards® and R2 certified electronics recyclers. Once an electronics recycler has been identified, buyers should confirm the certification on the e-Stewards® or R2 websites, which are linked to from the EPA map.

It is important to note that recycling facilities are certified at the facility level. A multi-facility or national organization must independently certify each of their locations. Due to the length of time required for certification, these multi-facility or national organizations may have some facilities that are certified and some that are not yet certified. Check to determine which facility location will be used to recycle your electronics, and ensure that specific facility is certified.

What contract language can we use in disposal contracts or agreements for electronics?

"The electronics recycler shall be certified under 1) the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2); and/or 2) the e-Stewards® standards. Additional information on recycler certification may be found at https://www.epa.gov/smm-electronics/certified-electronics-recyclers."

Where can we find additional information on handling electronics at end of life?

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a document, Federally Owned Electronics at End of Life. The document provides answers to frequently asked questions about federal electronics end-of-life management.


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