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Climate Change Adaptation

  
The new Climate Change Adaptation Program Area supports Federal agency climate adaptation planning. Please check in periodically for new information.

What is Climate Change Adaptation & Why is it Important?

Climate change adaptation means adjusting to a changing climate to minimize negative effects and take advantage of new opportunities. Climate change directly affects a wide range of Federal services, operations, programs, assets, and our national security. Through adaptation planning, an agency can identify how climate change is likely to impact its ability to achieve its mission, operate, or meet its policy and program objectives. By integrating climate change adaptation strategies into its planning, the Federal Government can ensure that resources are invested wisely and Federal services and operations remain effective in current and future climate conditions.

Background on the Implementing Instructions for Federal Agency Climate Change Adaptation

Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, establishes an integrated strategy for sustainability within the Federal Government. Under the Executive Order, each agency is required to evaluate their climate change risks and vulnerabilities to manage the effects of climate change on the agency's mission and operations in both the short and long-term as part of the formal Strategic Sustainability Performance Planning process. In it's October 2010 Progress Report, the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force recommended that CEQ issue climate change adaptation planning implementing instructions. The Implementing Instructions for Federal Agency Climate Change Adaptation Planning identify how agencies should respond to the adaptation requirements under the Executive Order.

Federal Framework for Adaptation Planning, and Guiding Principles

CEQ based its adaptation planning requirements on a six-step, flexible planning framework and eight Guiding Principles, as recommended by the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force. The planning framework is not meant to be prescriptive or to provide detailed recommendations for project-level adaptation, those detailed options will be developed over time by each agency with the help of a growing set of planning tools, illustrative case studies, and lessons learned. In addition, climate change adaptation planning in an iterative process; our knowledge of climate change is evolving, as is our understanding of different types of adaptive actions.

Please click on the links below for more information on specific planning actions.

Regulations, Guidance, and Policy
 
Federal
Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance
5 October 2009
This EO sets sustainability goals for Federal agencies and focuses on making improvements in their environmental, energy and economic performance. The Executive Order requires Federal agencies to set a 2020 greenhouse gas emissions reduction target within 90 days; increase energy efficiency; reduce fleet petroleum consumption; conserve water; reduce waste; support sustainable communities; and leverage Federal purchasing power to promote environmentally-responsible products and technologies.
EO was signed on 1 November 2013. The EO outlines Federal agency responsibilities in the areas of supporting climate resilient investment; managing lands and waters for climate preparedness and resilience; providing information, data and tools for climate change preparedness and resilience; and planning. Text of bill is here.
This document provides recommendations by the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force to the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality for implementing instructions to be used by Federal agencies in climate change adaptation planning in accordance with E.O. 13514 "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance", as required in Section 16 of the E.O.

Under the Instructions, Federal agencies will be responsible for carrying out the following:

  • Identify a senior agency official responsible for carrying out the planning actions required by the Implementing Instructions;
  • Establish a policy statement by June 2011 that affirms the agency's commitment to adaptation planning;
  • Identify opportunities that may arise as a result of climate change and assess agency vulnerability to the adverse consequences of climate change;
  • Identify three to five adaptation actions that the agency will implement in FY 2012; and,
  • Develop an agency climate change adaptation plan that responds to the risks and opportunities resulting from climate change by June 2012.
  • This Support Document to the Implementing Instructions for Federal Agency Climate Change Adaptation Planning, in accordance with Executive Order 13514, provides information to assist Federal agencies with meeting the Implementing Instruction requirements.
    This report was published 5 October 2010 by the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force. The report outlines recommendations on how Federal Agency policies and programs can better prepare the United States to respond to the impacts of climate change.
    Released by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) on 28 October 2011 this plan identifies steps that Federal agencies can take to improve management of freshwater resources in a changing climate.
    State
    The Pew Center on Global Climate Change's website for information on actions and policies at the state-level.
    The World Resources Institute (WRI) provides information on the role of states in a federal climate program, and facilitates discussions between state officials and federal policymakers so that regional efforts support, inform, and influence the creation of federal policy.
    Agency-Specific Climate Change/Adaptation
    Dated 29 June 2012 this plan outlines DHHS's policy and practices concerning Climate Change Adaptation Planning
    The U.S Department of Commerce's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, dated June 1, 2011, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    The Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology (PI-50), located within the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI), serves as the focal point within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the development, coordination, and implementation of DOE-related aspects of climate change technical programs, policies, and initiatives. The mission of the Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology is to accelerate the development and deployment of advanced technologies and best practices to mitigate climate change.
    This site provides access to DOIs climate change and climate adaptation policies as well as outlining the strategies they are implementing to reduce their carbon footprint.
    The U.S Department of Labor's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    The U.S Department of State's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, dated June 3, 2011, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    The U.S Department of Transportation's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, dated June 2011, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    The U.S. Department of Education's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, dated June 3, 2011, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    This site provides access to EPA's climate change and climate adaptation policies as well as outlining the strategies they are implementing to reduce their carbon footprint.
    The Farm Credit Administration's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    This site provides access to NASA's climate change and climate adaptation policies as well as outlining the strategies they are implementing to reduce their carbon footprint. Additional there are multiple publicly-available tools which can be used to track the progress of climate change.
    This site provides access to NOAA's climate change and climate adaptation policies as well as outlining the strategies they are implementing to reduce their carbon footprint. Additional there are multiple publicly-available tools which can be used to track the progress of climate change.
    The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    The Railroad Retirement Board's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, dated June 3, 2011, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    The U.S Social Security Administration's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    The Tennessee Valley Authority's policy statement on climate change adaptation planning, dated June 1, 2011, as required by Executive Order 13514, Section 8(i), and the Council on Environmental Quality's "Instructions for Implementing Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning in accordance with Executive Order 13514."
    This site provides access to USDA's climate change and climate adaptation policies as well as outlining the strategies they are implementing to reduce their carbon footprint. Additional there are multiple publicly-available tools which can be used to track the progress of climate change.
    This site provides access to USPS's climate change and climate adaptation policies as well as outlining the strategies they are implementing to reduce their carbon footprint.
    Supporting Information and Tools
     
    Databases/Software Tools
    Need help understanding Executive Order (EO) 13653, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change? GSA's Sustainable Facilities Tool (SFTool) can walk you through a hot annotated, or clickable terms, version of EO 13653 and provide information on definitions, strategies, and resource links along the way.
    Developed by EPA, BASINS is a multi-purpose, environmental analysis system that integrates a geographical information system (GIS), national watershed data, and state-of-the-art watershed modeling tools, including the Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) model, into one package. Specifically, BASINS CAT provides flexible capabilities for creating climate change scenarios allowing users to quickly assess a wide range of what if questions about how weather and climate could affect their systems. BASINS CAT does not provide climate change data for specific regions and watersheds. Combined with the existing capabilities of HSPF for assessing the effects of land-use change and management practices, BASINS CAT can be used to assess the coupled effects of climate and land-use change, and to guide the development of effective management responses.
    This DOE tool is an interactive framework that lets users explore the energy and carbon implications of altering the current U.S. energy profile. Using 'what-if' scenarios, users are able to adjust inputs to the electricity generation, buildings, industry and transportation sectors in order to compare outcomes to baseline reference cases.
    This is a NOAA and USDA-developed visualization program used to "see" potential impacts from coastal development or sea level rise. Users can download background pictures and insert the objects (hotel, house, marina, or other objects) of their choosing. The software is used by municipalities to brainstorm new ideas and policies, undertake project planning, and make presentations.
    This toolkit provides downloadable and customizable outreach materials to use during an extreme heat event.
    The Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) is an information and analysis tool on global climate change developed by the World Resources Institute. CAIT provides a comprehensive and comparable database of greenhouse gas emissions data (including all major sources and sinks) and other climate-relevant indicators.
    From the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), this is a web-based source for scientifically sound information and advice on the strengths, limitations, and applications of climate data. Experts who construct, evaluate, and compare climate data sets contribute their perspectives and advice on climate data and analysis methods for a broad community of data users. Users may participate by posting comments, questions, and links. NCAR has designed the tool to act as a living repository for the climate community's collective knowledge and expertise on a broad array of observational datasets and their appropriate use in analyses and model evaluation.
    Find resources to help companies, communities, and citizens understand and prepare for the impacts of coastal flooding and sea level rise. Over time, you'll find more datasets, web services, and tools, as well as other themes such as the vulnerability of the food supply and the threats to human health from climate change. Check out the data catalog to browse relevant datasets. If you are looking for a streamlined list, the resources page features datasets and services on coastal vulnerability.
    The Toolbox provides access to more than 500 resources that support climate adaptation planning at water utilities including: reports and publications; information about funding programs that could support climate-related actions by utilities and municipalities; upcoming workshops and training sessions; models and tools; and climate response materials that focus on mitigation and adaptive strategies. The Toolbox is organized into two sections: a highlighted resources section provides a selection of resources from each category and a map to help users select resources by geographic region; and a second section that features a search function that helps users to select resources based on their location, the size and type of their utility, and resources of interest.
    This EPA tool provides a structured approach for water utilities to assess climate change risks and identify adaptation options. CREAT includes information on climate change impacts and associated threats to utility assets and helps the user through an assessment process that helps to generate reports to evaluate different adaptation options. CREAT will evolve to meet utility needs as new resources become available.
    This toolkit was developed by the Digital Coast Partnership to help communities understand and address coastal inundation issues. Website components include: • Understand – What is coastal inundation, its causes, and impacts? • Identify – How do I recognize community risks? • Visualize – How can visualizations improve understanding of inundation? • Communicate – What are the best ways to communicate risk and vulnerability information? • Discover – What are others doing to address coastal inundation? This toolkit is an example of how the data, tools, and other information within Digital Coast can be used to address coastal issues. The toolkit provides the context and guidance for connecting the resources in the Digital Coast to the needs of coastal managers.
    This is an interactive suite of tools that help users visualize risks to coastal communities and habitats, and help decision makers reduce and mitigate the risks from storms and other hazards like coastal erosion and flooding. This interactive suite of tools allows users to examine storm surge, sea level rise, natural resources, and economic assets. It also allows users to develop risk reduction and restoration solutions. The Coastal Resilience tools build from critical resources provided by many groups and agencies including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), The Department of the Interior's U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), The Nature Conservancy, and the Natural Capital Project.
    An online database, maintained by the World Resources Institute, that focuses on the environmental, social, and economic trends that shape the world. "Climate and Atmosphere" is one of the ten topic areas. For each topic area there is a searchable database, country profiles, maps, feature stories, and global snapshots of each topic area by synthesizing country and region-level information. As of December 2010, WRI no longer actively maintains EarthTrends or its data collections. WRI has no plans to continue support for EarthTrends and cannot respond to requests for information or assistance. However, the site is still available for your convenience, with the understanding that the data sets available here may be out of date, and in many cases more recent information is available elsewhere.
    This tool includes data reported by the largest emitters of greenhouse gases. The data reported by direct emitters provides a "bottom-up" accounting of the major sources of GHG emissions associated with stationary fuel combustion and industrial processes. Well over half of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions are accounted for in this facility level data set, including nearly complete coverage of major emitting sectors such as power plants and refineries.
    The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section of the FEMP website is designed to provide Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG reduction goals in the most cost-effective way. Using a portfolio-based management approach for GHG mitigation planning, agencies will be able to prioritize strategies for GHG mitigation. Agencies can also use this guidance to set appropriate GHG reduction targets for different programs and sites within an agency
    This EPA database currently contains traits data for 3,857 North American macroinvertebrate taxa, and includes habitat, life history, mobility, morphology and ecological trait data. These data were compiled for a project on climate change effects on river and stream ecosystems. The traits data were gathered from multiple sources, which are listed on the web site under, "Data Source". Data gathering efforts focused on data that were published or otherwise well-documented by trustworthy sources, accessible, appropriate for the regions being studied, in a standardized format that could be analyzed or easily converted to a format that could be analyzed, and ecologically relevant to the gradients being considered.
    This website provides ready access to federally maintained geospatial data, services and applications. The website makes it possible for users to create customized maps using federal geospatial data and common geographic maps. They also can integrate their own data into the maps, and share the maps through Web browsers and mobile applications. The platform was developed by the Federal Geographic Data, an interagency committee chaired by the Secretary of the Interior. The panel also includes members from the Office of Management and Budget, Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Examples of maps in the system include: EPA cleanup sites; National Wetland Inventory; USA Soil Survey; and the USGS National Map.
    The purpose of this DOE Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) website is to assist Federal agencies with strategic planning for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The website will help agency personnel to evaluate mitigation strategies for different emission sources, including buildings, fleet vehicles, business travel and employee commuting, and prioritize projects to achieve reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner.
    This Geographic Information System (GIS) tool can be used to generate scenarios of housing-density changes and calculate impervious surface cover for the conterminous United States. The ICLUS User s Guide accompanies the tool. This product distributes the population projections and creates land use data described in the 2009 EPA report "Land-Use Scenarios: National-Scale Housing-Density Scenarios Consistent with Climate Change Storylines".
    This is an array of 24 climate and water information graphics for our region, covering recent and current precipitation, snowpack, drought, streamflow, reservoir, and ENSO conditions, and climate and ENSO forecasts. These graphics are served directly from their providers so that they are automatically updated in the Dashboard as often as the respective provider updates them. The user can select graphics to enlarge to full size, and move them around the Dashboard to compare with other information.
    This watershed modeling system includes streamlined Hydrologic Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF) algorithms for simulating hydrology, sediment, and general water quality on land as well as a simplified stream transport model. LSPC is derived from the Mining Data Analysis System (MDAS), which was developed by EPA Region 3 and has been widely used for mining applications and TMDLs. A key data management feature of this system is that it uses a Microsoft Access database to manage model data and weather text files for driving the simulation. The system also contains a module to assist in TMDL calculation and source allocations. For each model run, it automatically generates comprehensive text-file output by subwatershed for all land-layers, reaches, and simulated modules, which can be expressed on hourly or daily intervals. Output from LSPC has been linked to other model applications such as EFDC, WASP, and CE-QUAL-W2. LSPC has no inherent limitations in terms of modeling size or model operations. The Microsoft Visual C++ programming architecture allows for seamless integration with modern-day, widely available software such as Microsoft Access and Excel.
    This wiki is a materials management toolkit of: climate protection actions, example climate action plans, new approaches to GHG inventories, measurement tools, and links to additional resources.
    This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and tools to support people engaged in planning for the future of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. The goal is to be a one-stop hub to support planners and to provide useful information to the public.
    This is a searchable online database that provides a gateway to climate information for the Eastern US. It summarizes needs for climate information as articulated in publications; identifies available data, products and services; and captures planned and on-going projects. The goal is to offer a tool to search for regionally relevant climate information, and to facilitate collaborative opportunities across the network of climate-focused programs and partners in the Eastern US.
    This website is a gateway to a broad range of information related to climate in the Pacific Islands. It includes summaries of programs, projects, and activities, as well as products and services. Formed through the collaboration of and contributions from a family of agencies, institutions, and organizations, this website is intended to serve as a shared resource for research scientists, service providers, and decision-makers. The website provides access to a broad range of region specific information related to historical hindcasts and multi-decadal projections. For example, users can search, by region and/or climate variable, and find a list of relevant products along with a brief summary and a direct link to each. This developmental website was put together by representatives of the NOAA National Climatic Data Center working in support of the Pacific Climate Information System. For more information on the site, visit:
    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has released this online idea database of actions on adaptation to help businesses and communities adapt to climate change. The adaptation practices listed in the database include ensuring access to safe and clean drinking water, promoting resilience of business operations to disasters, providing technologies or services to help vulnerable communities adapt to climate change impacts, increasing agricultural yields in climate-vulnerable areas, developing climate-friendly goods and services, and "climate proofing" the supply chains of companies.
    The site provides a straightforward interface to data for 195 sites on streams and rivers throughout the West. This tool is intended for western water managers and the public to help increase accessibility of science-based information and understanding of how climate variations will impact the availability of water to communities.
    This database includes the results of environmental monitoring and research efforts on wave, tidal, and current energy development worldwide. Called "Tethys," after the Greek titaness of the ocean, the database will help industry regulators and energy project developers deploy sustainable ocean energy projects in an environmentally responsible manner.
    The USGCRP recently announced the online availability of a suite of scenarios on climate, sea level rise, land use and land cover, and other conditions. These scenarios were developed as input to the U.S. National Climate Assessment. The scenarios were developed by multiple agencies in consultation with a National Climate Assessment working group whose members include both university-based and federal research scientists.
    Developed by EPA, this an on-line tool that provides a flexible capability for creating user-determined climate change scenarios for assessing the potential impacts of climate change on sediment loading to streams using the USDA s Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model. In combination with the existing capabilities of WEPP for assessing the effectiveness of management practices, WEPPCAT also can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of strategies for managing the impacts of climate change.
    To facilitate TMDL analysis and watershed planning, WARMF was developed under sponsorship from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as a decision support system for watershed management. The system provides a road map to calculate TMDLs for most conventional pollutants (coliform, TSS, BOD, nutrients). It also provides a road map to guide stakeholders to reach consensus on an implementation plan. The scientific basis of the model and the consensus process have undergone several peer reviews by independent experts under EPA guidelines. WARMF is now compatible with the data extraction and watershed delineation tools of EPA BASINS. WARMF is organized into five (5) linked modules under one, GIS-based graphical user interface (GUI). It is a very user friendly tool suitable for expert modelers as well as general stakeholders.
    WAM is a tool that has been shown to be useful in the assessment of watershed-related properties. WAM was developed to allow engineers and planners to assess the water quality of both surface water and groundwater based on land use, soils, climate, and other factors. The model simulates the primary physical processes important for watershed hydrologic and pollutant transport. The WAM GIS-based coverages including: land use, soils, topography, hydrography, casin and sub-basin boundaries, point sources and service area coverages, climate data, and land use and soils description files.
    Directories/Catalogs/Newsletters
    EPA's Heat Island Listserv keeps registrants informed with periodic announcements of funding opportunities, webcasts, publications, and events of interest to the urban heat island community.
    This listserv issues news of important state and local developments in cost-effective climate and energy policies and technologies that can help address state and local concerns with air quality and greenhouse gases; energy prices, demand, and reliability; and economic development. Listserv messages announce new policy developments; highlight technology advances; share information on new studies, reports, and upcoming events; and note new funding opportunities.
    Libraries/Repositories
    This section of EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries Coastal Toolkit provides information on climate change adaptation options and other resources that can help coastal managers develop adaptation strategies.
    A virtual library of guidebooks, adaptation plans and case studies, including a map search feature. The site also hosts a directory of organizations and climate change professionals, and climate change tools.
    This website serves as a hub for recent climate-related work at the Academies. It highlights climate studies that have been produced by committees of leading scientists and other experts convened by the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and numerous other entities within the National Research Council. At this site, you will find brief summaries, booklets, videos, and other resources related to these reports. You will also find information about significant ongoing climate activities across the Academies.
    The Toolbox provides access to more than 500 resources that support climate adaptation planning at water utilities including: reports and publications; information about funding programs that could support climate-related actions by utilities and municipalities; upcoming workshops and training sessions; models and tools; and climate response materials that focus on mitigation and adaptive strategies. The Toolbox is organized into two sections: a highlighted resources section provides a selection of resources from each category and a map to help users select resources by geographic region; and a second section that features a search function that helps users to select resources based on their location, the size and type of their utility, and resources of interest.
    Sponsored by the U.S. DOT, the clearinghouse is designed as a one-stop source of information on transportation and climate change issues. It includes information on greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories, analytic methods and tools, GHG reduction strategies, potential impacts of climate change on transportation infrastructure, and approaches for integrating climate change considerations into transportation decision making.
    The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) has created this website featuring an easy-to-access collection of resources to help federal agencies with planning and implementation for climate change adaptation. Resources include relevant federal executive orders and strategic plans, selected technical reports on adaptation research, frameworks and other information to help agencies adapt their operations to changing climate conditions, and overview reports for higher-level decision makers.
    The nonpartisan Georgetown Climate Center seeks to advance effective climate, energy, and transportation policies in the United States--policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help communities adapt to climate change. The Georgetown Climate Center is part of Georgetown Law in Washington, D.C. The Center also seeks to ensure that national climate and energy policy is informed by lessons from existing state efforts and that national policies maintain an ongoing role for state innovation and implementation.
    A library of all GAO publications related to climate change since 1990.
    The Division of Earth and Life Sciences of the NAS publishes climate and weather related publications. Both finalized publication and in-progress studies are available.
    This NOAA site includes directories of adaptation plans, case studies and guidebooks for coastal adaptation.
    Organizations/Programs
    CICERO is an independent research center associated with the University of Oslo, Norway. CICERO conducts research on and provides information and expert advice about national and international issues related to climate change and climate policy.
    The Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC), hosted by the U.S. Forest Service, is a reference Web site for resource managers and decisionmakers who need information and tools to address climate change in planning and project implementation. The CCRC addresses the manager's question "What can I do about climate change?" by providing information about basic climate sciences and compiling knowledge resources and support for adaptation and mitigation strategies. The site offers educational information, including basic science modules that explain climate and climate impacts, decision-support models, maps, simulations, case studies, and toolkits.
    This website summarizes DOI offices and programs in the area of climate change.
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's climate change website.
    The GHG Institute is a non-profit organization founded in 2007 to build the GHG management infrastructure of the future, with a focus on training and supporting a global community of qualified professionals to work on GHG measurement, accounting, auditing and management.
    The IPCC is a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It was established to provide the decision-makers and others interested in climate change with an objective source of information about climate change. The IPCC doesn't conduct any research nor does it monitor climate related data or parameters. Its role is to assess on a comprehensive, objective, open and transparent basis the latest scientific, technical and socio-economic literature produced worldwide relevant to the understanding of the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts and options for adaptation and mitigation.
    A network of organizations working with the National Climate Assessment (NCA) to engage producers and users of climate assessment information across the United States.
    U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research climate change program website.
    The center provides analysis and resources on climate change science, technology, policy, markets, and initiatives through an extensive website.
    Website of US State Department global diplomatic efforts on climate change, including international efforts through the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.
    USGCRP coordinates and integrates federal research on changes in the global environment and their implications for society. Thirteen federal departments and agencies participate in the USGCRP. The site provides access to up-to-date research and publications concerning global warming as well as regional and sector climate information.
    Website of the UN for activities under the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol, including the Conference of Parties (COP) meetings (Cancun 2010). The website contains introductory and in-depth publications on the science of climate change, adaptation, mitigation, and international cooperation and treaties.
    A multi-agency research and development program for the development of climate change technology. The mission of the program is to accelerate the development and adoption of technologies that can reduce, avoid, or capture and store greenhouse gas emissions by strengthening the Federal research and development portfolio across more than a dozen participating agencies.
    An EPA-led partnership of western cities and states that are developing and sharing ways to integrate lifecycle materials management policies and practices into climate actions.
    WRI is an environmental think tank that goes beyond research to find practical ways to protect the earth and improve people's lives. AS one of their four programmatic goals, WRI seeks to " Protect the global climate system from further harm due to emissions of greenhouse gases and help humanity and the natural world adapt to unavoidable climate change."
    Lessons Learned
     
    Award Winners
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    Case Studies
    The purpose of this paper is to identify research needs for all aspects of the research-to-decision making pathway that will help us understand and mitigate the health effects of climate change, as well as ensure that we choose the healthiest and most efficient approaches to climate change adaptation. The paper is authored by the Interagency Working Group on Climate Change and Health (IWGCCH) an ad hoc group formed by participating federal agencies and organizations at the invitation of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
    This April 2012 guide provides federal, state, tribal and other natural resource managers with tools to more effectively address the complexities and uncertainties involved in natural resource management, especially under challenging conditions such as climate change. The Applications Guide includes case studies ranging from river flow management and protecting migratory birds to siting renewable energy projects. These are drawn from four areas important to Interior and its partners: climate change, water resources, energy, and human impacts on the landscape. The examples show the breadth of adaptive management applications at different scales and different levels of complexity.
    This December 2012 report is sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service Stream Systems Technology Center. The report summarizes findings of a collaborative effort between land managers and researchers in which at least one national forest from each of the Forest Service's nine regions participated. Eleven National Forests from throughout the United States conducted assessments of potential hydrologic change due to ongoing and expected rapid climate warming. Each National Forest identified water resources important in their area, assessed climate change exposure and watershed sensitivity, and evaluated the relative vulnerabilities of watersheds and water resources to climate change. The report provides an overview of core assessment components and highlights similarities and differences of the eleven pilot assessments. Important concepts that emerged during the pilot assessments are emphasized.
    A Department of Homeland Security (DHS) case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A Department of Transportation (DOT) case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A city of Chicago case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A city of Keene case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A King County, WA case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A Miami-Dade County, FL case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A city of New York City, NY case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A state of Maryland case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    A state of Oregon case study in agency level adaptation planning from the Implementing Instructions for Agency Adaptation Planning: Support Document, the White House Council on Environmental Quality, February 24, 2011.
    Dated February 2014, this report for the U.S. Department of Energy summarizes the lessons learned from 16 government, educational and nonprofit groups that received grants to advance the deployment of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). Participants in projects across 24 states and the District of Columbia assessed the barriers to and opportunities for PEV deployment in their regions and prepared and executed readiness plans. The report is designed to be an accessible primer to the key issues in PEV deployment and a roadmap to the detailed research, toolkits, and sample language for local policies contained in the readiness plans.
    This document outlines the necessary steps for cost-effective creation of a bicycle-friendly environment for employees at and visitors to Federal facilities.
    This analysis reviews the current major monitoring and evaluation frameworks, identifying key strengths, gaps, and the most suitable audiences for each resource. Their analysis highlights the opportunities and challenges facing the implementation of climate change adaptation programs, and most importantly, enables busy professionals and practitioners to identify which materials will help them most.
    This NOAA site includes directories of adaptation plans, case studies and guidebooks for coastal adaptation.
    This report to Congress was prepared by the Bureau of Reclamation and is dated April 2011. This report was prepared to fulfill the requirements of section 9503 of the SECURE Water Act and addresses the elements of section 9503 part (c): 1. each effect of, and risk resulting from, global climate change with respect to the quantity of water resources located in each major Reclamation river basin; 2. the impact of global climate change with respect to the operations of the Secretary in each major Reclamation river basin; each mitigation and adaptation strategy considered and implemented by the Secretary of the Interior to address each effect of global climate change; and 4. each coordination activity conducted by the Secretary with the USGS, NOAA, USDA, or any appropriate State water resource agency.
    Developed by The Nature Conservancy's California Program, this report evaluates nine green infrastructure case studies in California and makes a case for conservation as an effective tool to reduce risks of a changing climate. Each case study improves flood or coastal protection, provides habitat and preserves or restores the natural dynamics between water and land. The report reviews the available data on the costs and benefits of each case and, where possible, compares this information with the costs and benefits of a gray alternative at the same site.
    This EPA report, issued May 2011, identifies the top ten materials in California, Oregon, and Washington with the greatest potential for reducing GHG emissions if diverted from landfill disposal through recycling and composting. The report was produced by the West Coast Climate and Materials Management Forum and is EPA Report Number 910-R-11-003.
    The purpose of this report is to provide the transportation community (including highway engineers, planners, NEPA practitioners) with digestible, transparent, regional information on projected climate change effects that are most relevant to the U.S. highway system. This information is designed to inform assessments of the risks and vulnerabilities facing the current transportation system, and can inform planning and project development activities. The report is dated May 2010 and is sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration, U.S. DOT.
    This report provides information on the costs and benefits of green infrastructure solutions for bolstering local adaptation to climate change.
    Construction Design
    Produced February 2011 by The Center for Clean Air Policy the goals of the project were exploring and catalyzing adaptation to climate change at the local level, spreading adaptation best practices from partners to other local and professional communities, and influencing national and state climate adaptation policies. This report provides an assessment of general lessons learned over the course of the project and thoughts about future directions for local climate adaptation.
    Produced February 2011 by The Center for Clean Air Policy this paper provides information on the costs and benefits of "green" infrastructure solutions for bolstering local adaptation to climate change. This report will evaluate the performance and benefits of a selection of green infrastructure solutions, using their range of technological, managerial, institutional, and financial innovations as a proxy for their value for climate adaptation.
    Water
    The Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) initiative has updated its Adaptation Strategies Guide to include new information on how drinking water and wastewater utilities can approach sustainable practices, specifically green infrastructure and energy management activities. The Adaptation Strategies Guide contains easy to understand information on water sector-specific climate impacts and how utilities can adapt to these impacts. The information on green infrastructure and energy management complements the existing material by illustrating how sustainability can be an important part of an adaptation plan. The updated guide contains a number of case studies highlighting utilities that have implemented successful green infrastructure and energy management programs. The Guide can be accessed on the Tools & Resources tab.
    This is an overview of the Adaptation Strategies Guide for Water Utilities content and functionality.
    This conference brings together federal, state and local agencies; nonprofit organizations; and businesses to share information and attend technical training concerning pollution prevention, resource conservation and the appropriate management of used oil, household hazardous waste, and other toxins. The conference is co-sponsored by the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) and the Western Sustainability and Pollution Prevention Network (WSPPN). All sessions will be held on Wednesday and Thursday, May 16-17, 2012, and are 90 minutes in length. All submissions must be received by 5:00 p.m. (PST) on January 30, 2012.
    This report, "Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool Exercise with North Hudson Sewerage Authority and New York-New Jersey Harbor Estuary Program", is a product of an EPA-facilitated exercise, joined by EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities initiative and Climate Ready Estuaries program to support watershed partners, such as the National Estuary Programs, by using the Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool (CREAT) to help collaboratively identify climate change threats, assess potential consequences, and evaluate adaptation options at the utility and in the estuary. The report documents the methodology used and the outcomes of the exercise so that other water utilities and National Estuary Programs could conduct a similar exercise of their own as drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater utilities fulfill their public health and environmental missions.
    Released by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Risoe Center in April 2011, this guidebook describes adaptation strategies in the categories of water conservation; storm water control and capture; resilience to water quality degradation; preparation for extreme weather events; diversification of water supply; and mitigation. The Water Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provided technical and methodological expertise.
    Training, Presentations, and Briefings
    The U.S. FWS is offering this course designed to guide conservation and resource management practitioners through two essential elements in the design of climate adaptation plans and provide guidance in identifying which species or habitats are likely to be most strongly affected by projected changes. Vulnerability assessments are a critical tool in undertaking any climate change planning or implementation.
    The U.S. EPA, in partnership with six other federal agencies (National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management), developed this toolkit to aid educators in teaching how climate change is affecting our nation's wildlife and public lands, and how everyone can become "climate stewards." This kit is designed for classroom teachers and informal educators in parks, refuges, forest lands, nature centers, zoos, aquariums, science centers, etc. The new case studies and activities have been reviewed by scientists and educators in all 7 agencies involved in the creation of the kit.
    Presentation given by Gary Clow, Geology and Environmental Change Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, during the 2010 DOI Conference on the Environment in April 2010.
    This training series consists of three modules designed to help create a Great Lakes region that is "climate ready." Toward this end, these modules provide stakeholders and decision makers with clear information about Great Lakes climate, as well as what we need to adapt to, why, and how. This project was sponsored by the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network and the NOAA Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Team.
    An introduction to how different utilities around the country are effectively financing and implementing adaptation strategies. This session will feature different utility case studies.
    This training provides an overview of climate change impacts and the methodology and functionality of CREAT. EPA's CREAT software was developed under the EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) initiative, which provides drinking water, wastewater, and storm water utilities with practical tools, training, and technical assistance to confront climate change through climate related risk assessment.
    This training uses an example utility to demonstrate how to input utility information, identify threats, and access the climate information in CREAT. EPA's CREAT software was developed under the EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) initiative, which provides drinking water, wastewater, and storm water utilities with practical tools, training, and technical assistance to confront climate change through climate related risk assessment.
    This training demonstrates how to complete an assessment, develop an implementation plan, and generate reports. EPA's CREAT software was developed under the EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) initiative, which provides drinking water, wastewater, and storm water utilities with practical tools, training, and technical assistance to confront climate change through climate related risk assessment.
    This course was designed to provide land managers with a range of presentations by experts on carbon science, management, and policy. The three themes of the course are "The Carbon Cycle and the Role of Experts," "Carbon and Wildland Management," "Carbon Assessments and Markets." Fifteen presentations are included here, accompanied by references and links, and a set of quizzes on the material.
    This training provides an overview of definitions, baseline measurements, and other requirements outlined by the new executive order.
    The NWS Climate Services Division Seminar Series was created to build capacity in NWS field offices on climate-related topics. Speakers are chosen based on suggestions from NWS field offices for topics of interest. Topics previously addressed included: sea level rise, global warming issues, new tools/software, and communicating climate change to the public.
    Developed by the Climate Change and Water Working Group agencies (Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NOAA, EPA, and U.S. Geological Survey) in cooperation with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) COMET Program and the Western Water Assessment, this training module describes the process of selecting the best available climate projection information and using it to develop "climate-adjusted weather" inputs to be used for modeling climate change impacts. These modeled impacts can be used for planning future water resources. Specific steps of this process include: 1) recognizing the general science and terms associated with atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs); 2) making AOGCMs more regionally applicable through bias correction and downscaling; 3) determining climate change scenarios based on climate projections and selecting specific projections to inform each scenario; and 4) developing climate-adjusted weather inputs associated with each climate change scenario. The module is designed for water resource practioners, planners, water resource engineers, technical specialists and others that need to conduct technical studies for assessing the impacts of climate change on water and water-related natural resources, and is available to the public at no cost during the 2012-2013 pilot period.
    This webinar provides an overview of the National Climatic Data Center's monthly climate reports for the USA and the globe. The reports provide a monthly snapshot into the state of the climate system and some of the relevant datasets and analytical approaches.
    The Pew Center convened a workshop addressing the use of cost-benefit analysis in determining climate change costs. A major focus of the workshop was the inadequacy of traditional analytical tools, such as CBA, for guiding policy decisions about non-incremental changes in economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions. Many participants recommended a risk-management approach that views climate stabilization as insurance against uncertain but intolerable outcomes. The workshop report contains an extended summary of 17 presentations and the full text of nine background papers by experts in climate science and economics.
    Conferences and Events
    April 2014
    Hear from USEPA Climate Showcase Communities Grantees who have been piloting successful greenhouse gas mitigation projects at this free, 1-day workshop. Attendees of the workshop will hear directly from the government staff who designed and implemented these programs, and learn about best practices, tools, and resources that they can use to catalyze similar action in their own community. Attendees will also have the opportunity to talk informally with program representatives during café style discussions.
    June 2014
    The theme of the conference is "Bridging Emissions Science and Policy." The 16th GEIA conference aims to enhance connections between individuals and groups working on emissions research, regulatory, policy, and assessment.
    The conference will feature a technical program boasting over 500 speakers, hundreds of exhibitors displaying the newest products and services, social tours and networking events, and professional development courses taught by leading instructors.
    August 2014
    This two-day forum will build off a successful National Adaptation Forum held in Colorado in 2013. The attendance of many California leaders there underscored the need for a California-focused event, which will be held every other year to complement the biennial national conference.
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