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Our What's New page tells you what information has been recently added or updated at FedCenter.gov. Stop back here periodically to stay current on all recent activity at FedCenter.

October 23, 2020
A bill to require the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency to promulgate certain limitations with respect to pre-production plastic pellet pollution. (Congressional Record: 24 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5863-S5865)
A bill to require sales and leases of assets of public housing projects in connection with solar energy projects to financially benefit the residents of such public housing project and the budget of the public housing agency that owns such public housing project. (Congressional Record: 25 September 2020 [House] Pages H4961-H4962)
October 22, 2020
EPA is sharing Federal Facilities these enforcement highlights to raise awareness within the federal community of the types of issues that have contributed to non-compliance and EPA enforcement, along with relevant compliance assistance information.
A bill to promote low-carbon, high-octane fuels, to protect public health, and to improve vehicle efficiency and performance (Congressional Record: 24 September 2020 [House] Pages H4957-H4958.
The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) is amending its regulations to add a definition for electric bikes (E-bikes) and exclude E-bikes from the regulatory definition of an off-road vehicle where E-bikes are being used on roads and trails where mechanized, non-motorized use is allowed, where E-bikes are not propelled exclusively by a motorized source, and appropriate Reclamation Regional Directors expressly determine through a formal decision that E-bikes should be treated the same as non-motorized bicycles. This change facilitates increased E-bike use where other types of bicycles are allowed in a manner consistent with existing use of Reclamation land, and increases recreational opportunities for all Americans, especially those with physical limitations. This rulemaking is effective 23 November 2020. POC: Ryan Alcorn, Asset Management Division, Bureau of Reclamation, tel: (303) 445-2711; email: ralcorn@usbr.gov. (Federal Register: 23 November 2020 [Rule] Pages 67294-67299)
This webinar will discuss management implications of a follow up survey of the alligator snapping turtle population on the Flint River, 22 years after eliminating harvest, the success of a forest restoration project in the eyes of pine snakes, and the unexpected added value of surveys of one threatened species (the gopher tortoise) for the conservation of another (the gopher frog).
The USDA Forest Service announced it is now accepting applications for approximately $10 million in funding through the 2021 Wood Innovations Grant and the 2021 Community Wood Energy and Wood Innovation Grant. These grants seek to support local economies through wood products and wood energy innovations while reducing hazardous fuels and improving forest health.
October 21, 2020
USFWS proposes to reclassify the plant Eugenia woodburyana (no common name) from an endangered species to a threatened species under the ESA, due to improvements in the species' status since the original listing in 1994. This proposed action is based on a thorough review of the best available scientific and commercial information, which indicates that E. woodburyana is not currently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range, but it is likely to become so within the foreseeable future. If this proposal is finalized, E. woodburyana would remain protected as a threatened species under the Act. USFWS seek information, data, and comments from the public on this proposal. USFWS will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 21 December 2020. POC is Edwin Muñiz, Field Supervisor, USFWS, Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, P.O. Box 491, Boquerón, Puerto Rico 00622, tel: (787) 851-7297. (Federal Register: 21 October 2020 [Proposed Rule] pages 66906-66925)
The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)'s Technical Resilience Navigator (TRN) helps organizations manage the risk to critical missions from disruptions in energy and water services. It provides a systematic approach to identifying energy and water resiliency gaps and developing and prioritizing solutions that reduce risk. The TRN enables organizations to be proactive in identifying and addressing vulnerabilities to their critical energy and water systems to reduce outage impacts, and support continuous mission operations.
eProject Building 3.0 expands the tool's capability to accommodate two project types, utility energy service contracts (UESCs) and direct-funded projects, in addition to ePB's traditional focus, energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). While it was technically possible to use ePB for these project types before, the modifications make the tool considerably "friendlier" for users pursuing UESCs and direct-funded projects. Some of the modifications relate primarily to terminology, but there are also functional changes. As an example, savings "guarantees" are eliminated for UESCs, and direct-funded projects do not include loan amortization schedules. In addition, ePB version 3.0 provides a new project data report output that can be directly uploaded to FEMP's EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System (CTS) to populate the CTS Initiated Projects Report.
October 20, 2020
PFAS Project Lab maintains a public PFAS contamination site tracker, which now contains more than 850 PFAS-contaminated sites and over 600 contaminated water systems in the United States.
Newsletter sponsored by Northeastern University's Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute.
With a focus on monarchs in the southeastern U.S., learn about the specific habitat needs of larvae and adults, including details on host and nectar plants and their ecology. Participants will learn about specific habitat needs of larvae and adults. Presenters will highlight monarch ecology in terms of the habitats that best support them in the region, and the host plants and nectar plants that they prefer to use. Presenters will also discuss resources to help you select and find plant materials for restoring monarch habitat.
October 19, 2020
A bill to direct the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to encourage and expand the use of prescribed fire on land managed by the Department of the Interior or the Forest Service, with an emphasis on units of the National Forest System in the western United States. (Congressional Record: 17 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5705-S5706)
A bill to require the Secretary of Agriculture to establish a forest incentives program to keep forests intact and sequester carbon on private forest land of the United States. (Congressional Record 22 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5787-S5788)
October 16, 2020
EPA is proposing amendments to the Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After July 23, 1984. EPA is proposing specific amendments that would allow owners or operators of storage vessels subject to the Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels and equipped with either an external floating roof (EFR) or internal floating roof (IFR) to voluntarily elect to comply with the requirements specified in the National Emission Standards for Storage Vessels (Tanks). Comments must be received on or before 30 November 2020. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA), comments on the information collection provisions are best assured of consideration if the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) receives a copy of your comments on or before 16 November 2020. POC is Mr. Neil Feinberg, Sector Policies and Programs Division (E143-01), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; telephone number: (919) 541-2214; fax number: (919) 541-0516; and email address: feinberg.stephen@epa.gov. (Federal Register 16 October 2020 [Proposed Rule] Pages 65774-65782)
A bill to amend the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 to impose time limits on the completion of certain required actions under the Act. (Congressional Record: 17 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5705-S5706)
Disinfectant biofilm penetration and its effect on biofilm aerobic activity and viability are still unclear. The use of microelectrodes have contributed to a greater understanding of biological mechanisms in biofilm and sediments. This presentation will provide a summary of EPA's research conducted on disinfectant penetration into biofilm and sediment where the disinfectant concentrations were measured with microelectrodes. Free chlorine and monochloramine penetration will be compared, and the impact of disinfectant penetration on viability of biofilm will be discussed.
October 15, 2020
USFWS reclassify (downlist) the American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) from endangered to threatened on the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. This determination is based on a thorough review of the best available scientific and commercial information, which indicates that the threats to this species have been reduced to the point that it is not currently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range, but that it is likely to become so within the foreseeable future. They also finalize a rule under the authority of section 4(d) of the Act that provides measures that are necessary and advisable to provide for the conservation of the American burying beetle. This rule is effective 16 November 2020. POC Jonna Polk, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Oklahoma Ecological Services Field Office, 9014 East 21st St., Tulsa, OK 74129; tel: 918-382-4500. (Federal Register 15 October 2020 [Rule] Pages 65241-65261)
EPA will host the second annual America Recycles: Innovation Fair to showcase recent advances in recycling technology, product development, and materials usage. Exhibitors will display new recyclable products, goods made from recycled content, innovative education and communication methods, materials that promote more effective recycling, recycling and manufacturing research, and new technologies that are advancing recycling today and into the future. EPA plans to announce national recycling goals, provide an overview of its draft National Recycling Strategy, and facilitate engaging public and private sector discussions on advancing the state of the nation's recycling.
The EPA recently released a draft National Recycling Strategy and is now seeking public input through December 4th, 2020. The draft National Recycling Strategy identifies strategic objectives and actions needed to create a stronger, more resilient, and cost-effective U.S. municipal solid waste recycling system. This webinar will provide participants who may wish to comment on the draft with an overview of the draft National Recycling Strategy, as well the key questions EPA hopes commenters will answer. The draft National Recycling Strategy was developed as part of EPA's continued leadership in addressing the challenges facing the U.S. recycling system, including: confusion about what materials can be recycled, recycling infrastructure that has not kept pace with today's diverse and changing waste stream, reduced markets for recycled materials, and varying methodologies to measure recycling system performance. The draft strategy identifies actions to address these challenges that build on the collaborative efforts by stakeholders from across the recycling system that began under EPA's 2019 National Framework for Advancing the U.S. Recycling System.
October 14, 2020
A bill to amend the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 to clarify ambiguous provisions, align the Act with relevant case law, reflect modern technologies, optimize interagency coordination, and facilitate a more efficient, effective, and timely environmental review process (Congressional Record: 22 September 2020 [House] Pages H4715-H4716)
A bill to amend the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 to impose time limits on the completion of certain required actions under the Act. (Congressional Record: 17 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5705-S5706)
The first presentation, titled "Introducing Fire to Young Longleaf Stands" will familiarize viewers with the fire ecology of longleaf pine and the benefits of prescribed use of fire in young longleaf stands. Firing techniques, burn unit preparation and planning principles will also be introduced, in addition to parameters for successful burning. "Wildlife in the Longleaf Ecosystem" will be presented in the second hour. It will discuss the unique wildlife species that call longleaf home, as well as detail their habitat needs and the management practices that enrich both the habitats and the populations that use them.
October 13, 2020
EPA is correcting a final rule that appeared in the Federal Register on 26 March 2020. The EPA finalized the residual risk and technology review (RTR) conducted for the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfills source category regulated under national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP). This action corrects inadvertent errors in the cross-referencing and formatting in the Federal Register; as well as clarifies two operational and reporting requirements in the final rule. This action also revises the heading of 40 CFR part 60, subpart WWW as described in the final rule. The corrections and clarifications described in this action do not affect the substantive requirements of the regulations or the results of the RTR conducted for the MSW Landfills source category. This final rule is effective on 12 November 2020. POC is Andrew Sheppard, Natural Resources Group, Sector Policies and Programs Division (E143-03), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tel: (919) 541-4161; fax: (919) 541-0516; and email: Sheppard.Andrew@epa.gov. (Federal Register: 13 October 2020 [Rule] Page 64398-64401).
USFWS announced a 12-month finding on a petition to list the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly (Atlantea tulita), a species from Puerto Rico, as a threatened species and designate critical habitat under the ESA. USFWS propose to list the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly as a threatened species with a rule issued under section 4(d) of the Act ("4(d) rule"). If they finalize this rule as proposed, it would add this species to the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and extend the Act's protections to the species. They also propose to designate critical habitat for the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly under the Act. In total, approximately 41,266 acres (16,699.8 hectares) in six units in the municipalities of Isabela, Quebradillas, Camuy, Arecibo, Utuado, Florida, Ciales, Maricao, San Germán, Sabana Grande, and Yauco are within the boundaries of the proposed critical habitat designation. USFWS will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 14 December 2020. POC is Edwin Muñiz, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, P.O. Box 491, Road 301 km 5.1, Boquerón, PR 00622; tel: 787-851-7297. (Federal Register: 13 October 2020 [Proposed Rule] Pages 64908-64937)
USFWS withdraw the proposed rule to list the distinct population segment (DPS) of the North American wolverine (Gulo gulo luscus) occurring in the contiguous United States as a threatened species under the ESA. This withdrawal is based on their conclusion that the factors affecting the species as identified in the proposed rule are not as significant as believed at the time of the proposed rule. They base this conclusion on our analysis of current and future threat factors. They also find that North American wolverines occurring in the contiguous United States do not qualify as a DPS. Therefore, They are withdrawing our proposal to list the wolverine within the contiguous United States as a threatened species. The proposed rule that published 4 February 2013 (78 FR 7864), to list the distinct population segment of the North American wolverine occurring in the contiguous United States as a threatened species is withdrawn on 13 October 2020. POC is Jodi Bush, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Montana Ecological Services Office. (Federal Register 13 October 2020 [Proposed Rule] Pages 64618-64648).
A bill to promote the use of forest restoration residue harvested on National Forest System land for renewable energy. (Congressional Record: 16 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5651-S5652)
A bill to require facemasks in Federal facilities to prevent the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. (Congressional Record: 17 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5705-S5706)
October 12, 2020
October 09, 2020
A bill to amend the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act to move the enforcement office to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, to increase the civil monetary penalties for failure to follow the processes established by that Act, to protect confidential information. (Congressional Record 17 September 2020 [House] Pages H4540-H4542)
A bill to amend the Endangered Species Act of 1973 to increase transparency, to support regulatory certainty, and to reauthorize that Act. (Congressional Record: 16 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5651-S5652)
A bill to amend the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 to reform agency process requirements. (Congressional Record: 16 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5651-S5652)
A bill to amend the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 to reform agency process requirements. (Congressional Record: 16 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5651-S5652)
October 08, 2020
USFWS determined threatened species status under the ESA for the coastal distinct population segment (DPS) of Pacific marten (Martes caurina), a small mammal from coastal California and Oregon. They also issue final regulations that are necessary and advisable to provide for the conservation of this DPS under section 4(d) of the Act (a "4(d) rule"). This final rule extends the Act's protections to the coastal DPS of Pacific marten, subject to the 4(d) rule's exceptions. This rule is effective 9 November 2020. POC is Dan Everson, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office. (Federal Register 8 October 2020 [Rule] Pages 63806-63831)
USFWS determined threatened species status under the ESA for the coastal distinct population segment (DPS) of Pacific marten (Martes caurina), a small mammal from coastal California and Oregon. They also issue final regulations that are necessary and advisable to provide for the conservation of this DPS under section 4(d) of the Act (a "4(d) rule"). This final rule extends the Act's protections to the coastal DPS of Pacific marten, subject to the 4(d) rule's exceptions. This rule is effective 9 November 2020. POC is Dan Everson, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office. (Federal Register 8 October 2020 [Rule] Pages 63806-63831)
USFWS determined threatened species status for the eastern black rail (Laterallus jamaicensis jamaicensis) under the ESA. Accordingly, they list the eastern black rail, a bird subspecies known from as many as 35 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil, and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America, as a threatened species under the Act. The effect of this regulation will be to add this subspecies to the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. They also finalize a rule under the authority of section 4(d) of the Act that provides measures that are necessary and advisable to provide for the conservation of the eastern black rail. They have determined that designation of critical habitat for the eastern black rail is not prudent. This rule is effective 9 November 2020. POC is Tom McCoy, Field Supervisor, South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office, 176 Croghan Spur Road, Suite 200, Charleston, SC 29407; tel: 843-727-4707. (Federal Register: 8 October 2020 [Rule] Pages 63764-63803)
USFWS proposes to reclassify the red-cockaded woodpecker (Dryobates (= Picoides) borealis) as a threatened species with a rule issued under section 4(d) of the ESA. If they finalize this rule as proposed, it would reclassify the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened on the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife (List). This proposal is based on a thorough review of the best available scientific and commercial data, which indicate that the species' status has improved such that it is not currently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. Thet are also proposing a rule under the authority of section 4(d) of the Act that provides measures that are necessary and advisable to provide for the conservation of the red-cockaded woodpecker. In addition, we correct the List to reflect that Picoides is not the current scientifically accepted generic name for this species. We seek information, data, and comments from the public regarding this proposal. They will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 7 December 2020. POC is Aaron Valenta, Chief, Division of Restoration and Recovery, USFWS, Southeast Regional Office, 1875 Century Boulevard, Atlanta, GA 30345; tel: 404-679-4144. (Federal Register: 8 October 2020 [Proposed Rule] Pages 63474-63499)
EPA proposed standards to reduce the environmental impact of discharges, such as ballast water, that are incidental to the normal operation of commercial vessels. When finalized, this new rule will streamline the current patchwork of federal, state, and local requirements that apply to the commercial vessel community and better protect our nation's marine waters. EPA is proposing to establish national standards of performance for incidental discharges from commercial vessels as required under the Vessel Incidental Discharge Act (VIDA). The proposed rule includes discharge-specific standards for 20 different types of vessel equipment and treatment systems, as well as general performance standards that would apply more broadly to the full range of incidental discharges. The proposed rule also outlines procedures for states working through EPA or the U.S. Coast Guard to seek more stringent requirements, request emergency orders, or apply for no-discharge zones for one or more of the incidental discharges in any or all state waters. EPA will accept comment on the proposal for 30 days, following publication in the Federal Register.
October 07, 2020
A bill to amend the Clean Air Act to prohibit the emission of any greenhouse gas in any quantity from any new electric utility steam generating unit. (Congressional Record 17 September 2020 [House] Pages H4540-H4542)
A bill to amend the Energy Policy and Conservation Act to modify the definition of water heater under energy conservation standards. (Congressional Record: 16 September 2020 [Senate] Pages S5651-S5652)
October 06, 2020
A bill to provide supplemental appropriations for the cleanup of legacy pollution, including National Priority List sites, certain abandoned coal mining sites, and formerly used defense sites, to replace lead drinking water service lines, to provide grants under certain programs, and to amend the Clean Air Act to prohibit the issuance of new major source air pollution permits in overburdened communities. (Congressional Record: 16 September 2020 [House] Pages H4489-H4490)
A bill to amend the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 with respect to the application of the Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure rule to certain farms. (Congressional Record 17 September 2020 [House] Pages H4540-H4542)
The EPA announced that in FY 2020 the Agency deleted all or part of 27 sites from the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL). EPA deletes sites or parts of sites from the NPL when no further cleanup is required to protect human health or the environment. Years, and sometimes decades, of complex investigation and cleanup work have gone into getting these sites to where they are today. While EPA encourages site reuse throughout the cleanup process, deletions from the NPL can help revitalize communities and promote economic growth by signaling to potential developers and financial institutions that cleanup is complete. Over the past several years, the EPA has placed special emphasis on deleting sites and portions of sites to demonstrate to communities that cleanup is complete
October 05, 2020
The National Park Service is soliciting electronic comments on the significance of properties nominated before 19 September 2020, for listing or related actions in the National Register of Historic Places. Comments should be submitted electronically by 20 October 2020. (Federal Register: 5 October 2020 [Notice] Pages 62757-62758)
October 02, 2020
A bill to ensure opportunities for Department of Defense participation in wildlife conservation banking programs. (Congressional Record: 15 September 2020 [House] Pages H4427-H4428)
A bill to amend the Energy Policy and Conservation Act to modify the definition of water heater under energy conservation standards. (Congressional Record: 16 September 2020 [House] Pages H4489-H4490)
Managing forest habitat for birds doesn't have to be difficult and often aligns closely with familiar forestry practices. Learn what bird species rely on forests, why their presence is a quick and dependable indicator of forest health, and how to use this information to speak with both foresters and landowners to maximize forest productivity across multiple disciplines. This webinar will also cover methods, tools, and application rates of herbicides frequently used in habitat management.
Long term research plays an invaluable role in informing natural resource management, particularly for long-lived wildlife species. However, short term and even opportunistic research can also yield important and sometimes surprising results relevant to management. This webinar will discuss management implications of a follow up survey of the alligator snapping turtle population on the Flint River, 22 years after eliminating harvest. In addition the success of a forest restoration project from the eyes of pine snakes, and the unexpected added value of surveys of one threatened species (the gopher tortoise) for the conservation of another (the gopher frog).
The Invasive Species Leadership Team (ISLT) has been the Corps of Engineers' go-to team for invasive species expertise since 2005. The 26 members and liaisons of the ISLT represent the Corps of Engineers on interagency committees, promote Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) research programs, and actively contribute to the Invasive Species Management Community of Practice. ISLT success is a result of working together, blending policy and science with action to respond to threats to our nation's water resources.
September 30, 2020
USFWS designated critical habitat for the trispot darter (Etheostoma trisella) under the ESA. They are designating as critical habitat for this species six units, totaling approximately 175.4 miles (282.3 kilometers) of streams and rivers and 9,929 acres (4,018 hectares), in Calhoun, Cherokee, Etowah, and St. Clair Counties in Alabama; Gordon, Murray, and Whitfield Counties in Georgia; and Bradley and Polk Counties in Tennessee. This rule extends the Act's protections to the trispot darter's designated critical habitat. This rule is effective 30 October 2020. POC is William Pearson, Field Supervisor, USFWS, tel: 251-441-5184. (Federal Register: 30 September 2020 (Rule) Pages 61619-61638)
USFWS proposes to reclassify the plant beach layia (Layia carnosa) from an endangered to a threatened species under the ESA. This proposed reclassification is based on our evaluation of the best available scientific and commercial information, which indicates that the threats acting upon beach layia continue at the population or rangewide scales, albeit to a lesser degree than at the time of listing, and they find that beach layia meets the statutory definition of a threatened species. They also propose to issue protective regulations pursuant to section 4(d) of the Act ("4(d) rule") that are necessary and advisable to provide for the conservation of beach layia. USFWS seek information and comments from the public regarding this proposed rule. USFWS will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 30 November 2020. POC is Jennifer Norris, Assistant Field Supervisor, Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office, 1655 Heindon Rd., Arcata, CA 95521; tel: 707-822-7201. (Federal Register: 30 September 2020 [Proposed Rule] Pages 61684-61700)
USFWS proposes to reclassify the Virgin Islands tree boa (Virgin Islands boa; Chilabothrus (= Epicrates) granti) from an endangered species to a threatened species with a rule issued under section 4(d) of the ESA. If they finalize this rule as proposed, it would reclassify the Virgin Islands boa from endangered to threatened. This proposal is based on a thorough review of the best available scientific data, which indicate that the species' status has improved such that it is not currently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. USFWS are also proposing a rule under the authority of section 4(d) of the Act that provides measures that are necessary and advisable to provide for the conservation of the Virgin Islands boa. Further, USFWS are correcting the List to change the scientific name of the Virgin Islands boa in the List from Epicrates monensis granti to Chilabothrus granti to reflect the currently accepted taxonomy. They will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 30 November 2020. POC is Edwin E. Muñiz, Field Supervisor, USFWS, Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, Road 301 Km 5.1, Corozo Ward, Boquerón, Puerto Rico 00622; or P.O. Box 491, Boquerón, Puerto Rico 00622; tel: 787-851-7297. (Federal Register: 30 September 2020 [Proposed Rule] Pages 617000-61717).
U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Energy Technologies Office (WETO) has worked on ways to protect bats at wind farms. One solution is the development of an ultrasonic bat deterrent technology, from initial concept to recent commercial deployment at wind farms domestically and abroad.
This course explains how and where distributed wind systems could be installed at federal sites. The training includes an overview of what distributed wind is and covers the wind-specific issues that need to be addressed to proceed through the Federal Energy Management Program's recommended project development and implementation process (i.e., what is needed to go from an initial screening to assessing procurement options). These issues include wind resource assessment, common wind myths, applicable policies and incentives, applicable regulations, land availability, mission compatibility, project costs, project sizing and siting, turbine technology, and other logistical, technical, and economic considerations.
September 29, 2020
USFWS announces 12-month findings on a petition to list the purple lilliput (Toxolasma lividum), longsolid (Fusconaia subrotunda), and round hickorynut (Obovaria subrotunda) freshwater mussels as endangered or threatened species and to designate critical habitat under the ESA. They find that listing the longsolid and round hickorynut is warranted. They propose to list the longsolid and round hickorynut as threatened species. If finalized it would add these species to the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and extend the ESA's protections to the species.. After a thorough review of the best available scientific and commercial information, USFWS find that it is not warranted at this time to list the purple lilliput. For the proposed rule to list and designate critical habitat for the longsolid and round hickorynut, USFWS will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 28 December 2020. POC is Janet Mizzi, Field Supervisor, USFWS, Asheville Ecological Services Field Office, 160 Zillicoa St., Asheville, NC 28801; tel: 828-258-3939. (Federal Register: 29 September 2020 [Proposed Rule] pages 61384-61458).
USFWS proposes to list the Wright's marsh thistle (Cirsium wrightii), a plant species from New Mexico, as a threatened species and designate critical habitat under the ESA. After a review of the best available scientific and commercial information, they find that listing the species is warranted. USFWS proposes to list the Wright's marsh thistle as a threatened species with a rule issued under section 4(d) of the Act ("4(d) rule"). If finalized it would add this species to the List of Endangered and Threatened Plants and extend the Act's protections to the species. USFWS also proposes to designate critical habitat for Wright's marsh thistle under the Act. The proposed critical habitat totals approximately 64.3 hectares (ha) (159 acres (ac)) in Chaves, Eddy, Guadalupe, Otero, and Socorro Counties, New Mexico. USFWS will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 30 November 2020. POC Shawn Sartorius, Field Supervisor, New Mexico Ecological Services Field Office, 2105 Osuna Rd. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113; tel: 505-346-2525. (Federal Register: 29 September 2020 [Proposed Rule] pages 61460-61498)
USFWS proposes to list the Wright's marsh thistle (Cirsium wrightii), a plant species from New Mexico, as a threatened species and designate critical habitat under the ESA. After a review of the best available scientific and commercial information, they find that listing the species is warranted. USFWS proposes to list the Wright's marsh thistle as a threatened species with a rule issued under section 4(d) of the Act ("4(d) rule"). If finalized it would add this species to the List of Endangered and Threatened Plants and extend the Act's protections to the species. USFWS also proposes to designate critical habitat for Wright's marsh thistle under the Act. The proposed critical habitat totals approximately 64.3 hectares (ha) (159 acres (ac)) in Chaves, Eddy, Guadalupe, Otero, and Socorro Counties, New Mexico. USFWS will accept comments received or postmarked on or before 30 November 2020. POC Shawn Sartorius, Field Supervisor, New Mexico Ecological Services Field Office, 2105 Osuna Rd. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113; tel: 505-346-2525. (Federal Register: 29 September 2020 [Proposed Rule] pages 61460-61498)
BirdCast provides real-time predictions of bird migrations: when they migrate, where they migrate, and how far they will be flying. Knowledge of migratory behavior can support decisions about conservation actions on the ground to mitigate numerous hazards birds face and to prevent deaths of millions of birds annually. Accurate migration models can have broad application, allowing researchers to understand behavioral aspects of migration, how migration timing and pathways respond to changing climate, and whether linkages exist between variation in migration timing and subsequent changes in population size.
September 25, 2020
EPA is designating one ocean dredged material disposal site (ODMDS), the Isles of Shoals North Disposal Site (IOSN), located in the Gulf of Maine off the coast of southern Maine and New Hampshire, pursuant to the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA). This action is necessary to serve the long-term need for an ODMDS for the possible future disposal of suitable dredged material from harbors and navigation channels in southern Maine, New Hampshire, and northern Massachusetts. The basis for this action is described herein and in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA). The FEA identifies designation of the IOSN as the preferred alternative from the range of options considered. The Site Management and Monitoring Plan (SMMP) is provided as Appendix G of the FEA. The Final rule is effective on 26 October 2020. POC is Ms. Regina Lyons, EPA, Region 1, 5 Post Office Square, Suite 100, Mail Code: 06-1, Boston, MA 02109-3912, tel: (617) 918-1557; email: lyons.regina@epa.gov. (Federal Register: 25 September 2020 [Rule] Pages 60370-60383)
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Last Updated: March 08, 2017