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The Grants page contains information on various Federal, State and non-profit organization grant opportunities. The list is arranged by media type.
To view a video on how to find and apply for a Federal grant, click here.
Please select a category from the list above or scroll down through the lists of grant programs below.

General
EPA grants made available to reduce pollution at the local level through community-based programs that build partnerships to help the public understand and reduce toxic risks from numerous sources. Examples of projects include addressing land- and air-pollution issues in Somerville, MA; reducing toxics and promoting green alternatives in Portland, OR; dealing with ground and surface water contamination on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Ethete, WY.; controlling storm water run-off in St. John, Virgin Islands; and reducing disparities in asthma and blood-lead levels in Baltimore, MD. Applications for the 2010 CARE grants are due March 9, 2010. Eligible applicants include county and local governments, tribes, non-profit organizations and universities.
The Grants Competition Advocate's (GCA) office in OGD administers and oversees EPA's Policy for Competition in Assistance Agreements and provides advice and support to EPA program offices and grant management offices on matters related to the process of competing assistance agreements. The website includes information on open competitive grant opportunities at EPA.
Grants.gov allows organizations to electronically find and apply for competitive grant opportunities from all Federal grant-making agencies. Grants.gov is THE single access point for over 900 grant programs offered by the 26 Federal grant-making agencies.
The STAR program funds research grants and graduate fellowships in numerous environmental science and engineering disciplines through a competitive solicitation process and independent peer review. The program engages the nation's best scientists and engineers in targeted research that complements EPA's own outstanding intramural research program and those of our partners in other federal agencies.
Each year, the State of New Hampshire provides substantial grant and loan opportunities to municipalities and others, to support environmental infrastructure improvements and other environmental and public health projects.
This site links you to programs that help fund development of new environmental technologies and offers information on existing environmental technologies. EPA offers several programs to assist the public and private sectors in developing and commercializing new environmental technologies. This is done through financial, testing and verification support, and by promoting use and acceptance of a technology through collaborative, incentive, partnership and advocacy, and information programs.
The foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, has funding available for projects around the country. The Foundation is dedicated to helping organizations realize their vision of a clean and safe environment by nationally matching projects with funders. Enter your project idea into the Project Pipeline which places it into a dynamic database that is used to fund specific funding criteria and funding sources. The StEPP Foundation works with government, for profit, and not for profit entities that have a need or requirement to fund environmental projects.
The purpose of the (NRI) Program is to support research, extension, and education grants that address key problems in sustaining all components of agriculture. Over 30 areas of interest identified, including but not limited to: biobased products and bioenergy, managed ecosystems, watershed processes & water resources, rural development and air quality. $120 to $150 million expected to be available.
Air
This is an Air Resources Board program that co-funds the demonstration of innovative technologies that can reduce air pollution. Its purpose is to advance such technologies toward commercial application, thereby reducing emissions and helping the economy of California.
Cleanup
This document provides a sample of the federal incentives that can be leveraged for clean and renewable energy and development of contaminated land.
Energy
This includes incentives related to a variety of clean energy options and uses.
A comprehensive source of information on state, local, utility, and selected federal incentives that promote renewable energy. Information easily accessed by clicking on the state of interest.
This document provides a sample of the federal incentives that can be leveraged for clean and renewable energy and development of contaminated land.

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Greenhouse Gases
A grant-based program that advances the green economy in distressed communities by supporting projects that create jobs through, and increase private capital investment in, efforts to limit the nation's dependence on fossil fuels, enhance energy efficiency, curb greenhouse gas emissions and protect natural systems. Eligible projects include green building construction, the development of renewable energy, greater energy efficiency, product reuse, and natural resource restoration that result in either a green end-product, the greening of an existing function or process, or a third-party certified green building.
Greening Activities
Illinois non-profit organizations and local and state government agencies may submit letters of inquiry for new construction or major rehabilitation projects that fall within either of the following program priorities:
  • Energy Efficiency: Creating model energy efficient public buildings throughout Illinois. Funding is available for the incremental costs of designing and/or commissioning new facilities to be highly energy efficient.
  • Renewable Energy:Installing small-scale solar or wind power generation systems. Funding is available for the installation of solar photovoltaic systems; small wind turbines; and solar thermal systems.
Letters of inquiry will be processed as received on a rolling-review basis. Information on the application process is available here.
The Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation is accepting letters of inquiry related to the installation of small-scale solar or wind power generation systems. Nonprofit organizations and local or state government agencies may apply for funding under the following formulas:
  • for solar photovoltaic systems, grants are available at a level of $2,000 per kW up to 50 kW per site;
  • for small wind turbine systems, grants are available at a level of $500 per kW up to 100 kW per site.
Letters of inquiry may be submitted at any time during 2004 for "rolling review." Application guidelines are available here.
The American Planning Association, the Enterprise Foundation, the Natural Resources Defense Council, AIA, and other organizations are partners in the Green Communities Initiative. Launched in the fall of 2004, the initiative is a five-year, $550 million commitment to build more than 8,500 environmentally friendly affordable homes across the U.S.

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Hazardous Waste
No items available
Natural Resources
This program provides grants for a variety of activities, including the following: creek cleanups, eradication of exotic or invasive plants; revegetation efforts; bioengineering bank stabilization projects; channel reconfiguration to improve stream geomorphology and aquatic habitat functions; acquisition of parcels critical for flood management; and coordination of community involvement in projects.
A voluntary program intended to stimulate the development and adoption of innovative conservation approaches and technologies while leveraging Federal investment in environmental enhancement and protection, in conjunction with agricultural production. Eligible projects must use "innovative conservation strategies" to address environmental problems such as agricultural air emissions, water quality, and nutrient management. The grants are available to state and local agencies, non-profit groups, corporations, Native American tribes, and individual farmers and ranchers.
The National Association of Counties, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the Wildlife Habitat Council, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Community-Based Restoration Program within NOAA Fisheries, and other sponsors (e.g., Office of Surface Mining), are pleased to solicit applications for the Five-Star Restoration Matching Grants Program. The Five-Star Restoration Program provides modest financial assistance on a competitive basis to support community-based wetland, riparian, and coastal habitat restoration projects that build diverse partnerships and foster local natural resource stewardship through education, outreach and training activities.
Realizing that aquatic habitat protection efforts may not coincide with the application timeline or grant period for the Grants Program and that many grassroots projects can be completed for under $500, the Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Network and Fund maintains a reserve to support urgent projects or those that present a special opportunity. Although the eligibility, overarching goal, types of activities funded, priority program areas, and evaluation criteria are the same as the Grants Program, Special Opportunity Grant (SOG) requests are processed differently to ensure quick turnaround. United States applicants that do not have 501(c)(3) tax status or Ontario applicants that are not registered charities governed by the Charities Accounting Act must have a sponsoring 501(c)(3) organization or registered charity. Grants will be disbursed on a first come, first served basis. For more information about the types of activities funded and application materials, visit the web site.
This RFP, in conjunction with other funding opportunities under the Initiative, will be used to competitively provide funding to address the most significant Great Lakes ecosystem problems and efforts in five major focus areas: Toxic Substances and Areas of Concern; Invasive Species; Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution; Habitat and Wildlife Protection and Restoration; and Accountability, Education, Monitoring, Evaluation, Communication and Partnerships. Proposals must be received by EPA by noon Central standard time on January 29, 2010. Entities eligible to apply for grants under this RFP include state agencies, any agency or instrumentality of local government, interstate agencies, federally-recognized tribes and tribal organizations, non-profit organizations as described in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, and other public or non-profit private agencies, institutions, and organizations.
The foundation funds projects to conserve and restore fish, wildlife, and native plants through matching grant programs. The Foundation awards matching grants to projects that address priority actions promoting fish and wildlife conservation and the habitats on which they depend, work proactively to involve other conservation and community interests, leverage Foundation-provided funding, and evaluate project outcomes. Federal, state, and local governments, educational institutions, and nonprofit organizations are welcomed to apply for a general matching grant throughout the year.
This program was developed to provide flexible funding to sustain existing place-based collaborative efforts as well as incentive to take necessary risks to innovate and move the field of collaboration forward. The CSP provides two types of small grants: 1) Capacity Grants where up to $5,000 is available for organizational development needs in collaborative efforts. Capacity grant funds can be used for a wide range of tools including but not limited to: training, consultants, community outreach, group facilitation, program development, nonprofit management skill-building, and communications. 2) Innovation Grants where up to $10,000 is available for expenses related to the implementation of new ideas or strategies that will move the field of collaboration forward and that have the potential to be transferred to other collaborative efforts across the country.
This program is designed to promote the creation of locally based organizations or groups seeking to resolve natural resource issues through a collaborative process.
This provides 1:1 matching grants to organizations implementing action-oriented, on-the-ground stewardship and citizen-based science projects that benefit America's National Forests and Grasslands. By matching NFF federal funds to non-federal dollars raised by award recipients, MAP effectively doubles the resources available to nonprofit partners for implementing these projects.
This program is for locally based collaborative efforts working on natural resource issues on National Forests and Grasslands. The purpose of the Mid-Capacity Assistance Program is to support relatively young nonprofit organizations as they leverage their initial project successes and experiences, while strengthening their operating infrastructure.
The Small Grants Program is a competitive, matching grants program that supports public-private partnerships carrying out projects in the United States that further the goals of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. These projects must involve long-term protection, restoration, and/or enhancement of wetlands and associated uplands habitats for the benefit of all wetlands-associated migratory birds.
The Family Fund's Environment program emphasizes conservation of natural resources, protection of health as affected by the environment, meaningful implementation and enforcement of the nation's environmental laws, the cessation and cleanup of pollution caused by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, and public participation in national environmental policy debates. Letters of inquiry may be mailed to the Rockefeller Family Fund, 437 Madison Avenue, 37th Floor, New York, NY, 10022. Letters of inquiry may also be sent to the Family Fund at the following e-mail address: mmccarthy@rffund.org
This fund welcomes preproposals for projects that enhance the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Applicants should propose projects that will return the greatest ecosystem benefits. Current Fund interests include Preventing Biological Pollution, Restoring Natural Flow Regimes and Using Market Mechanisms for Environmental Improvement. Additional projects are sought to add to, and expand Fund supported work in these areas. Preproposals may be submitted at any time. The Fund will begin to review preproposals upon receipt.
For 2005-2007, Ecology will offer grants for shoreline master program updates. These grants will be jointly funded with state funds ($4 million has been requested for the biennium) and CZM funds. Ecology intends to continue to dedicate up to $400,000 in federal CZM funds per year to these shoreline planning grants. The availability of these funds is subject to federal approval of the state’s annual CZM awards.
The Wetland Program Development Grants (WPDGs), initiated in FY90, provide eligible applicants an opportunity to conduct projects that promote the coordination and acceleration of research, investigations, experiments, training, demonstrations, surveys, and studies relating to the causes, effects, extent, prevention, reduction, and elimination of water pollution.
Pesticides
Grants Application for these grants is due April 19, 2010. The maximum funding level is $250,000 per project. The project period of performance is limited to two years. The assistance agreements are for research, public education, training, monitoring, demonstration and studies.
EPA is soliciting applications to implement the Pesticide Regulatory Education Program (PREP) from eligible States, federally recognized Indian tribes, Alaska Native Villages, Inter-tribal consortia and State and tribal institutions for fiscal year (FY) 2010 through 2014. Under this program OPP/OC will provide financial assistance on an annual basis to carry out a pesticide education training program. This pesticide-related training is intended for senior management, senior scientists, and supervisors and managers of pesticide regulatory programs from state/tribes and U.S. territories working under FIFRA Cooperative Agreements with EPA throughout the U.S. Applications are due April 20, 2009.
Pollution Prevention
EPA grants made available to reduce pollution at the local level through community-based programs that build partnerships to help the public understand and reduce toxic risks from numerous sources. Examples of projects include addressing land- and air-pollution issues in Somerville, MA; reducing toxics and promoting green alternatives in Portland, OR; dealing with ground and surface water contamination on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Ethete, WY.; controlling storm water run-off in St. John, Virgin Islands; and reducing disparities in asthma and blood-lead levels in Baltimore, MD. Applications for the 2010 CARE grants are due March 9, 2010. Eligible applicants include county and local governments, tribes, non-profit organizations and universities.
The EPA invites investigator initiated grant proposals in areas including but not limited to: Lifestyle and Cultural Practices of Tribal Populations and Risks from Toxic Substances in the Environment, Developing Regional-Scale Stressor-Response Models for Use in Environmental Decision-Making, and Airborne Particulate Matter Health Effects. Contact names, funding amounts and due dates vary by program area.
The Pollution Prevention Grant Program supports State and Tribal technical assistance programs which help businesses identify better environmental strategies and solutions for reducing or eliminating waste at the source. Grants will be awarded and managed by each of EPA's 10 Regional Pollution Prevention Program Offices. Grant amounts awarded are dependent on the Congressional appropriations for this program and the quality of proposals received.

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Recovery Act Grants & Guidance
 
Recovery Act Grants
No items available
Recovery Act Guidance
This is the central government-wide data collection system for Federal Agencies and Recipients of Federal awards under Section 1512 of the Recovery Act. Recipients will access FederalReporting.gov in order to fulfill their reporting obligations. Federal Agencies, Prime Recipients and Sub Recipients are required to submit data on a quarterly basis for grants, loans, and contracts under the Recovery Act.
Site provides maps of Recovery Act investments by state, Recovery Act investments by recipient, and the estimated effect of the Recovery Act on jobs by state.
Use the map provided here to visit state and territorial websites that outline additional and, often, more detailed information on programs in specific areas.
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Solid Waste
The DOR administers funding programs to assist organizations in establishing and promoting convenient beverage container recycling and litter abatement projects, and to encourage market development and expansion activities for beverage container materials. Funds are available through two beverage container recycling grant programs, the community conservation corps funding program, and the city/county payment program.
The department offers grants to help start or expand source reduction, recycling, composting, and household hazardous waste programs in Indiana.
This program works to reduce the amount of solid waste generated and landfilled in Iowa. Through a competitive process, financial assistance is available for a variety of projects, including source reduction, recycling and education.
Sustainability
The Foundation's Conservation and Science Program is focused on the challenge of sustainability--finding paths for human progress that protect and restore the ecological systems upon which all life depends. We invest in action and in ideas, supporting initiatives to secure public policy reforms to changes in private sector practices and scientific activities to develop essential knowledge and tools for understanding and addressing current and future priorities. The Program supports work on four priorities: Oceans and Coasts, Atmosphere, Sustainability Science, and Packard Fellowships for Science and Engineering.
The foundation is committed to protecting and restoring the earth's natural systems and promoting a sustainable society by strengthening individuals, institutions, and communities pledged to pursue those goals. Nationally, the Foundation makes grants primarily in the areas of environment and reproductive rights. In the New York metropolitan area, grants are made to local environmental organizations. There is no application deadline, and complete application procedures are available on the website.
The EA grant program was established to provide financial assistance for the development of environmentally sustainable practices in Minnesota through voluntary partnerships and goal-oriented, economically driven approaches to pollution prevention and resource conservation.
The Rockefeller Brothers Fund (RBF) sustainable development grantmaking endeavors to support environmental stewardship that is ecologically based, economically sound, socially just, culturally appropriate, and consistent with intergenerational equity. The Fund encourages government, business, and civil society to work collaboratively on environmental conservation and to make it an integral part of all development planning and activity. Recognizing the global nature of many environmental problems, the Fund also promotes international cooperation in addressing these challenges. Awards range from $25,000 to $300,000. A preliminary letter of inquiry is recommended.
The foundation focuses its grantmaking on initiatives that promise to have an impact on the Great Lakes region, specifically the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. A small number of environment grants are made to organizations in Canada. Grant program areas include Education, Employment, Environment, Gun Violence, Money and Politics, and Culture. The Foundation supports the development, testing, and implementation of policy-based, prevention-oriented, scientifically sound solutions to the environmental challenges facing the region, especially those that center around water. Grant proposals are considered at meetings of the Foundation's Board of Directors in April, July, and December.
Terrorism Prevention
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has funding opportunities for bioterrorism related research.
Water
This program provides grants for a variety of activities, including the following: creek cleanups, eradication of exotic or invasive plants; revegetation efforts; bioengineering bank stabilization projects; channel reconfiguration to improve stream geomorphology and aquatic habitat functions; acquisition of parcels critical for flood management; and coordination of community involvement in projects.
The Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection Web site is a searchable database of financial assistance sources (grants, loans, cost-sharing) available to fund a variety of watershed protection projects.
The Safe Drinking Water Act, as amended in 1996, established the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund to make funds available to drinking water systems to finance infrastructure improvements. The program also emphasizes providing funds to small and disadvantaged communities and to programs that encourage pollution prevention as a tool for ensuring safe drinking water.
The Small Grants Program is a competitive, matching grants program that supports public-private partnerships carrying out projects in the United States that further the goals of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. These projects must involve long-term protection, restoration, and/or enhancement of wetlands and associated uplands habitats for the benefit of all wetlands-associated migratory birds.
These grants are intended for acid mine drainage abatement, mine cleanup efforts, abandoned oil and gas well plugging and local watershed-based conservation projects. These projects can include: watershed assessments and development of watershed restoration or protection plans; implementation of watershed restoration or protection projects (stormwater management wetlands, riparian buffer fencing and planting, streambank restoration (especially FGM), agricultural BMPs); construction of mine drainage remediation systems; reclamation of previously mined lands; and demonstration/education projects and outreach activities.
Section 106 of the Clean Water Act authorizes EPA to provide federal assistance to states (including territories, the District of Columbia, and Indian Tribes) and interstate agencies to establish and implement ongoing water pollution control programs. Prevention and control measures supported by State Water Quality Management programs include permitting, pollution control activities, surveillance, monitoring, and enforcement; advice and assistance to local agencies; and the provision of training and public information.
Under authority of Section 104(b)(3) of the Clean Water Act, EPA makes grants to state water pollution control agencies, interstate agencies, and other nonprofit institutions, organizations, and individuals to promote the coordination of environmentally beneficial activities. These activities include storm water control, sludge management, and pretreatment. Among the efforts that are eligible for funding under the Section 104(b)(3) program are research, investigations, experiments, training, environmental technology demonstrations, surveys, and studies related to the causes, effects, extent, and prevention of pollution.
The Wetland Program Development Grants (WPDGs), initiated in FY90, provide eligible applicants an opportunity to conduct projects that promote the coordination and acceleration of research, investigations, experiments, training, demonstrations, surveys, and studies relating to the causes, effects, extent, prevention, reduction, and elimination of water pollution.
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Terminator
 
Last Updated: August 16, 2013