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Chemical Management

  

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The focus of the Chemical Management Program Area is emergency planning, community right-to-know, and reporting of substances and processes at facilities which may pose a threat. This program area does not solely apply to manufacturers or large federal facilities. Chemicals include liquids, solids, and gaseous substances. A substance as common as "white-out" or a household pesticide/herbicide are considered a chemical as well as paints, strippers, thinners, toluene, mercury, chlorine, and trichloroethane.

Executive Order 14057: Catalyzing Clean Energy Industries and Jobs Through Federal Sustainability was signed by President Biden on 8 December 2021. Accompanying this Executive Order is the Federal Sustainability Plan, which states The Administration reinstates the EPA's Toxics Release Inventory reporting, referencing the CEQ Memorandum, Agency Compliance with Sections 301 through 313 of the EPCRA.

The CEQ Memo states, "Each agency must continue to comply with the provisions set forth in sections 301 through 313 of EPCRA, as amended, in light of applicable guidance issued by EPA, and without regard to the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) or North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) delineations."

    EPCRA Sections 301 to 303 contain Emergency Planning provisions requiring local governments to prepare chemical emergency response plans, and to review plans at least annually. State governments are required to oversee and coordinate local planning efforts. Facilities that maintain Extremely Hazardous Substances (EHS) on-site in quantities greater than corresponding threshold planning quantities (TPQs) (see 40 CFR 355, Appendix A) must cooperate in emergency planning preparation.

    EPCRA Section 304 contains Emergency Notification provisions requiring facilities to immediately report accidental releases of EHSs and "hazardous substances" defined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Any releases of these substances in quantities greater than their corresponding Reportable Quantities (RQs) (see 40 CFR 355, Appendix A) must be reported to state and local officials. There are specific additional provisions for continuous release reporting.

    EPCRA Sections 311 and 312 addresses the Community Right-to-Know Requirement commonly referred to as a Tier I or Tier II Report (see 40 CFR 370). The purpose of these reports are to provide State and local officials and the public with information on the general hazard types and locations of hazardous chemicals present at your facility during the previous calendar year. The Tier I form contains general information on hazardous chemicals at the facility. The Tier II form contains specific information on hazardous chemicals present at the facility. Since the promulgation of the final rule published in 1987, states were given the flexibility to implement hazardous chemical inventory reporting requirements, as appropriate for the needs of their community. This flexibility included adding more chemicals, setting lower reporting thresholds and creating a reporting form or format that included information beyond that required by the federal reporting requirements. Tier I/Tier II forms are due by 1 March each year. Generally, Tier I/Tier II reporting is required for:

    • A hazardous chemical that is an EHS which is present at your facility at any one time in an amount equal to or greater than 500 pounds (227 kg--approximately 55 gallons) or the Threshold Planning Quantity (TPQ), whichever is lower. (see 40 CFR 355, Appendix A).
    • A hazardous chemical that is not an EHS is present at your facility at any one time in an amount equal to or greater than 10,000 pounds (or 4,540 kg).

    See the EPA EPCRA website for additional information on EPCRA Sections 311 and 312 exempted hazardous chemicals and State specific programs

    EPCRA Section 313 details the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) reporting requirements. Facilities must complete and submit a toxic chemical release inventory form (Form R) annually. Form R must be submitted for each of the over 600 TRI chemicals that are manufactured or otherwise used above the applicable threshold quantities. To help facilities determine if they are required to submit a Form R, EPA has developed the The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Threshold Screening Tool , a step-by-step questionnaire to determine if a facility meets or exceeds established facility, employee, and chemical thresholds.

    When reporting under EPCRA Section 313 is required (i.e., Toxic Release Inventory [TRI] reporting), current EPA guidance must be followed.

    Clean Air Act Section 112r - Risk Management Plan (RMP) Rule & General Duty Clause Overview

    Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act Amendments requires EPA to publish regulations and guidance for chemical accident prevention at facilities that use certain hazardous substances. These regulations and guidance are contained in the Risk Management Plan (RMP) rule. The RMP rule requires facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop a Risk Management Plan which:

    • identifies the potential effects of a chemical accident,
    • identifies steps the facility is taking to prevent an accident, and
    • spells out emergency response procedures should an accident occur.
    These plans, which must be revised and resubmitted to EPA every five years, provide valuable information to local fire, police, and emergency response personnel to prepare for and respond to chemical emergencies in their community. Making RMPs available to the public also fosters communication and awareness to improve accident prevention and emergency response practices at the local level. The RMP rule was built upon existing industry codes and standards. It requires facilities that use listed regulated Toxic or Flammable Substances for Accidental Release Prevention to develop an RMP and submit that plan to EPA. The rule includes a List of Regulated Substances List of Regulated Substances under section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, including their synonyms and threshold quantities (in pounds) to help assess if a process is subject to the RMP rule.

    These regulated substances are also subject to the requirements of the General Duty Clause, which applies to any stationary source producing, processing, handling, or storing regulated substances or other extremely hazardous substances. "Other extremely hazardous substances" are any chemicals listed in 40 CFR part 68, or any other chemicals, which may be considered extremely hazardous.

    Facilities subject to the General Duty Clause are responsible for:

    • Knowing the hazards posed by the chemicals and assessing the impacts of possible releases
    • Designing and maintaining a safe facility to prevent accidental releases
    • Minimizing the consequences of accidental releases that do occur

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Regulations, Guidance, and Policy
Also known as Title III of SARA, EPCRA was enacted by Congress as the national legislation on community safety. This law was designated to help local communities protect public health, safety, and the environment from chemical hazards.
CEQ memo directing federal agencies to follow the reporting requirements of section 301 through 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA).
EPA has an interpretive statement in response to questions raised about Clean Water Act (CWA) permitting requirements for the application of pesticides to or over the nation's waters. The statement reflects EPA’s belief that a CWA permit is not required where application of a particular pesticide to or over water is consistent with requirements under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). However, EPA is reinforcing for local officials, resource managers, agricultural producers, and other pesticide users the importance of applying pesticides in accordance with their label directions.
Section 112(r)(1), also known as the General Duty Clause, applies to any facility where extremely hazardous substances are present. GDC is a performance-based authority recognizing that owners and operators have a general duty and responsibility to prevent and mitigate the consequences of chemical accidents.
The RMP Rule implements Section 112(r) of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. RMP requires facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop a Risk Management Plan. These plans must be revised and resubmitted to EPA every five years.
Questions submitted to the EPA about EPCRA and their answers.
In this database, users can browse and search frequently asked questions about EPCRA, RMP, and Oil Pollution Prevention (which includes oil discharge regulations, SPCC, and FRP). In addition, users can submit their own question if they do not find a similar one in the Database.
Climate Crisis; Efforts to Protect Public Health and Environment and Restore Science
January 20, 2021
This Executive Order directs all executive departments and agencies to immediately review and, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law, take action to address the promulgation of Federal regulations and other actions during the last 4 years that conflict with these important national objectives, and to immediately commence work to confront the climate crisis. In addition, this EO revokes several EOs including: • EO 13834, except for Section 6. Duties of the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer, Section 7. Duties of Heads of Agencies, and Section 11. General Provisions. • Executive Order 13778 Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and Economic Growth by Reviewing the "Waters of the United States" Rule • Executive Order 13783 Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth • Executive Order 13807 Establishing Discipline and Accountability in the Environmental Review and Permitting Process for Infrastructure Projects
Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad
January 27, 2021
The EO has three overarching objectives 1) promote safe global temperature, 2) increase climate resilience, and 3) support financial a pathway toward low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development. The EO reinstates the Presidential Memorandum of September 21, 2016 (Climate Change and National Security), establishes the Climate Policy Office within the Executive Office of the President and establishes a National Climate Task Force. In addition, the EO aims to use Federal procurement to support robust climate action including a carbon pollution-free electricity sector, no later than 2035 and clean and zero-emission vehicles for Federal, State, local, and Tribal government fleets.
Catalyzing Clean Energy Industries and Jobs Through Federal Sustainability
December 8, 2021
President Biden has signed an Executive Order that demonstrates how the United States will leverage its scale and procurement power to lead by example in tackling the climate crisis. The executive order will reduce emissions across federal operations, invest in American clean energy industries and manufacturing, and create clean, healthy, and resilient communities.
Overview of EO 14057.
Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act requires owners/operators of a stationary source that manufactures, uses, stores, or otherwise handles more than a threshold quantity of a listed regulated substance in a process, to implement a risk management program and submit a single RMP for all covered processes at the facility.
The Federal Sustainability Plan sets out a range of ambitious goals to deliver an emissions reduction pathway consistent with President Biden's goal of reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emission by 50–52 percent from 2005 levels by 2030 and limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, as the science demands.
The General Duty Clause in Section 112(r)(1) makes the owners/operators of facilities with regulated hazardous substances responsible for managing chemicals safely.
EPA developed the following guidance to assist the regulated community in understanding the Risk Management Program (RMP) rule.
Details approaches for implementing the general duty clause of the Clean Air Act (CAA), explains statutory requirements, and describes how to assess compliance.
This database is designed to enable users to locate documents, including publications, OSW memos, and other outreach materials, that cover a wide range of RCRA issues and topics.
Issued August 2013, the guidance document is intended to assist regional inspectors in reviewing a facility's implementation of the Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) rule at 40 CFR part 112 and understanding the rule's applicability, and to help clarify the role of the inspector in the review and evaluation of the performance-based SPCC requirements. The guidance document is also available to owners and operators of facilities that may be subject to the requirements of the SPCC rule and the general public on how EPA intends the SPCC rule to be implemented. The document is designed to provide a consistent national policy on several SPCC-related issues.
Supporting Information and Tools
 
Databases/Software Tools
Note: ACToR and AcTORWS web services have been retired and are being replaced in the near future with new versions. If you have any question or urgent need please contact ccte_scdcd@epa.gov This is EPA's online warehouse of all publicly available chemical toxicity data and can be used to find all publicly available data about potential chemical risks to human health and the environment. ACToR aggregates data from over 500 public sources on over 500,000 environmental chemicals searchable by chemical name, other identifiers and by chemical structure.
Use this page to find health and safety information submitted to EPA under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). This information is intended for individuals interested in learning more about chemicals that are manufactured or imported into the United States.
View a listing of chemicals that are monitored by EPA's Major Program Systems: Air (AFS), Water (PCS), Hazardous Waste (RCRIS),Superfund (CERCLIS) and Toxics Release Inventory (TRIS).
A free program you can use to find out about the reactivity of substances or mixtures of substances (reactivity is the tendency of substances to undergo chemical change). It includes:
  • a database of reactivity information for more than 6,000 common hazardous chemicals,
  • a way for you to virtually "mix" chemicals--like the chemicals in a derailed tankcars --to find out what dangers could arise from accidental mixing.
This tool displays key health and safety data in an online format that allows comparison of chemicals by use and by health or environmental effects. The search tool combines available TSCA information and provides streamlined access to EPA assessments, hazard characterizations, and information on safer chemical ingredients. Additionally, the tool allows searches by chemical name or Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) number, use, hazard effect, or regulatory action.
All functionality previous provided in EDSP21 and ToxCast have been migrated to the CompTox Chemicals Dashboard and new data has been made available.
ChemHAT, the Chemical Hazard and Alternatives Toolbox, is an internet database designed to offer up easy to use information that we can use to protect ourselves, our families and our co-workers against the harm that chemicals can cause. ChemHAT was created to answer two questions: "Can this chemical in my workplace affect my health?" and "Are there safer alternatives?" You can look up a chemical from a product or an SDS either by its chemical name or Chemical Abstracts Services (CAS) registration number.
A system of software applications used widely to plan for and respond to chemical emergencies. It is one of the tools developed by EPA's Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Office (CEPPO) and NOAA, to assist front-line chemical emergency planners and responders. They can use CAMEO to access, store, and evaluate information critical for developing emergency plans. In addition, CAMEO supports regulatory compliance by helping users meet the chemical inventory reporting requirements of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA, also known as SARA Title III). CAMEO also can be used with a separate software application called LandView ® to display EPA environmental databases and demographic/economic information to support analysis of environmental justice issues.
The most recent ToxCast data is available in the invitroDBv3.3 database. The database was released in September 2020. Data files from previously published ToxCast data releases are still available for download here. This page provides links to all relevant ToxCast chemical and assay data. ToxRefDB contains mammal toxicity information that when combined with other sources of information, such as exposure and metabolism, form the basis for pesticide risk assessments.
This system provides complete and easy access to technical health and environmental effect information on chemicals that are manufactured in exceptionally large amounts. Information in this database are submitted through EPA's High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program. HPVIS allows users to search for summary information, test plans, and new data on high production volume chemicals as they are developed.
EPA's website of databases of human activity pattern data to provide input into researcher's exposure models.
IRIS is an EPA database of human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. IRIS was initially developed for EPA staff in response to a growing demand for consistent information on chemical substances for use in risk assessments, decision-making and regulatory activities. The information in IRIS is intended for those without extensive training in toxicology, but with some knowledge of health sciences.
The Consolidated List of Chemicals Subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act was prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 313 of EPCRA and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. It will also help sites determine whether they will be subject to accident prevention regulations under CAA section 112(r). These lists should be used as a reference tool, not as a definitive source of compliance information.
The National Response Center (NRC) is the sole federal point of contact for reporting oil and chemical spills. In addition to gathering and distributing spill data for Federal On-Scene Coordinators, the NRC serves as the communications and operations center for the National Response Team, which is chaired by EPA. Through this website, the user can download Excel files of reports that have been made to the Center.
The intent of this software is to help companies/organizations find alternate chemical mixtures or solvents that still improve their processes but are not as harmful to our environment. The PARIS III database includes more than 4000 solvents commonly used by industry. In the search for replacements, it taps only those that have less environmental impact (greener), mixing them together in different proportions to find mixtures that perform as close as possible to the performance of those currently used by companies. The close replacement mixtures found can then be sorted to choose those mixtures that are least harmful to the environment. This solvent substitution software tool is provided by the EPA for free, and can be effective and efficiently used to help environmentally-conscious individuals find better and greener solvent mixtures for many different common industrial processes.
RMP*Comp is an electronic tool used to perform the off-site consequence analysis required under the Risk Management Program rule published by the EPA on July 20, 1996, which implements Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act. Previously, EPA has referred to this tool as RMP Calculator or RMP Assistant.
This system provides information on substances and how they are represented in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations and information systems.
EPA has developed Tier2 Submit to help facilities prepare an electronic chemical inventory report. Tier2 Submit is free to download and fully compatible with CAMEOfm.
A tool to help facilities determine and complete their Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) section 313 (TRI) reporting obligations.
EPA's Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program has put out new data and resources to help you better understand toxic chemical releases in your area. EPA published new TRI data about chemical waste management and pollution prevention activities that took place during 2021 at more than 20,000 federal and industrial facilities across the country. Need help accessing and using the new data? Check out this new video on how to find the preliminary dataset in Envirofacts and import the data into a spreadsheet application. Finally, news organizations rely on TRI data when examining trends in chemical releases, analyzing the performance of industry sectors, and evaluating environmental conditions. To help members of the press more easily find, understand and use TRI data, EPA has published the "TRI for the Press" webpage.
This system provides fast and easy access to the TRI data to help communities identify facilities and chemical releases that warrant further study and analysis.
This tool provides access to the pollution prevention/source reduction information submitted in the TRI reports.
The inventory is a list of each chemical substance that is manufactured or processed in the United States.
Directories/Catalogs/Newsletters
No items available
Libraries/Repositories
Beyond Benign will be hosting a monthly Green Chemistry Connection around Green Chemistry education using the Green Chemistry Students Learning Objectives from the Green Chemistry Commitment program as a loose framework. The topics for discussion will be Green Chemistry theory, toxicology, laboratory skills and application of Green Chemistry education. Each time we meet, we will host up to 4 speakers from the community who are actively practicing Green Chemistry in their courses and/or laboratories, as well as give time for discussion in small groups along with networking and resource sharing.
PCRC is maintained by the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS). The PCRC is one of the Compliance Assistance Centers developed by industry-government partnerships, with support from EPA's Office of Compliance.
This site contains links to information on TRI chemical lists, tri pbt chemicals, list changes, toxicity, regulatory program information, fact sheets, and chemical specific guidance documents.
Organizations
AIChE, was founded in 1908. AIChE is a professional association of more than 50,000 members that provides leadership in advancing the chemical engineering profession. Chemical engineers are at the forefront of research to assure the safe and environmentally-sound manufacture, use, and disposal of chemical products.
Beyond Pesticides is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization which advocates safe, healthy, LIVING lawns and landscapes with the use of organic and least toxic practices and products that nurture healthy lawns and landscapes and protect the health of children, families, pets, wildlife and the environment from unnecessary exposure to toxic pesticides.
A publicly accessible service that provides information on the regulatory requirements for the following EPA programs: Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA); Risk Management Plan (RMP) Rule; and Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule and Facility Response Plan (FRP) Rule. The Information Center does not provide regulatory interpretations. It does, however, maintain up-to-date information on the availability and distribution of publications and other resources pertaining to its program areas.
Beyond Benign will be hosting a monthly Green Chemistry Connection around Green Chemistry education using the Green Chemistry Students Learning Objectives from the Green Chemistry Commitment program as a loose framework. The topics for discussion will be Green Chemistry theory, toxicology, laboratory skills and application of Green Chemistry education. Each time we meet, we will host up to 4 speakers from the community who are actively practicing Green Chemistry in their courses and/or laboratories, as well as give time for discussion in small groups along with networking and resource sharing.
CCPA brings together manufacturers, insurers, government, academia, and expert consultants to lead the way in improving manufacturing process safety. CCPS and its sponsors are committed to protecting employees, communities, and the environment by developing engineering and management practices to prevent or mitigate catastrophic releases of chemicals, hydrocarbons, and other hazardous materials.
The NRC is the sole federal point of contact for reporting oil and chemical spills. In addition to gathering and distributing spill data for Federal On-Scene Coordinators, the NRC serves as the communications and operations center for the National Response Team, which is chaired by EPA. The NRC has implemented an on-line query system that makes oil and chemical spill data available online.
An independent federal agency investigating chemical accidents to protect workers, the publice, and the environment. The CSB determines the causes of accidents but does not issue fines or penalties. The immediate causes of accidents often involve equipment failures, human errors, unforeseen chemical reactions or other hazards. But the ultimate goal of the Board's investigations is to determine the root causes of accidents, which typically are deficiencies in safety management systems.
Supporting Information and Tools Bottom Border

 

Lessons Learned
 
Award Winners
This program is an opportunity for individuals, groups, and organizations to compete for annual awards in recognition of innovations in cleaner, cheaper, smarter chemistry. The Program provides national recognition of outstanding chemical technologies that incorporate the principles of green chemistry into chemical design, manufacture, and use, and that have been or can be utilized by industry in achieving their pollution prevention goals.
Accident Prevention & Reporting
Provides information about EPA's Emergency Management programs, their emergency management partners, and locating information resources for cleanup or response activities.
This book, intended for safety managers, chemists, and engineers alike, helps both small and large companies address safe handling, processing and storing of chemicals that might become involved in uncontrolled chemical reactions. The Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS), in partnership with OSHA, the EPA, the American Chemistry Council, and Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers Association, has made this book available.
Case Studies
The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program collects information to track industry progress in reducing waste generation and moving towards safer waste management alternatives. These tools and resources can help identify effective environmental practices and highlighting pollution prevention successes. Use the TRI Pollution Prevention Search to learn how facilities have reduced releases of toxic chemicals to the environment and compare how different facilities have managed their toxic chemical waste. Database can be searched by industry sector, chemical, geography or parent company, and compare environmental performance.
Chemical Identification
ToxCast™ Phases I and II are testing a combined total of about 2,000 chemicals. Chemical nominations came from within EPA, from other U.S. agencies (NTP, NIEHS, FDA), from international organizations such as OECD and from other stakeholder groups. In Phase III, ToxCastTM will expand the list to thousands of environmental chemicals, delivering an affordable, science-based system for decision-makers.
Chemical Use Reduction
SFI is an approach that encourages pollution prevention in new chemical development through the transfer of EPA's chemical risk screening methodologies.
The P2 Framework is compilation of many of EPA's Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) most important computer-based methods for predicting risk-related information. The P2 Framework provides important methods to predict risk-related information that may not be readily available. Its purpose is to provide information that can inform decision making and help promote the design, development, and application of safer chemicals, products, and processes.
This tool provides access to the pollution prevention/source reduction information submitted in the TRI reports.
Community Right-to-Know
Federal facilities that have chemicals held above the following thresholds must submit either copies of their MSDSs or a list of MSDS chemicals to the SERC, LEPC, and local fire department:
  • for all extremely hazardous substances present in amounts >= 500 lb (227 kg, approximately 55 gal) or the threshold planning quantity, whichever is lower
  • for gasoline (all grades combined) in amounts >= 75,000 gal (or approximately 283,900 L) when the gasoline is in tanks entirely underground at a retail gas station that was in compliance during the preceding CY with all applicable UST regulations
  • for diesel fuel (all grades combined) in amounts >= 100,000 gal (or approximately 378,500 L) when the diesel is in tanks entirely underground at a retail gas station that was in compliance during the preceding CY with all applicable UST regulations
  • for all other hazardous chemicals present at any one time in amounts >= 10,000 lb (4540 kg).
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Training, Presentations, and Briefings
This course provides participants with an introduction to applied environmental chemistry principles and practices which underlie the release, fate and transport, sampling, analysis, and cleanup of chemicals contaminating environmental media with particular emphasis on soil and groundwater.
This 2-day course provides participants with a review of fundamental chemical concepts which underlie an understanding of applied environmental chemistry concepts and practices. This course is designed for environmental professionals who are not chemists, but who require a basic knowledge of chemistry and environmental chemistry in their work.
A system of software applications used widely to plan for and respond to chemical emergencies. It is one of the tools developed by EPA's Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Office (CEPPO) and NOAA, to assist front-line chemical emergency planners and responders. They can use CAMEO to access, store, and evaluate information critical for developing emergency plans. In addition, CAMEO supports regulatory compliance by helping users meet the chemical inventory reporting requirements of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA, also known as SARA Title III). CAMEO also can be used with a separate software application called LandView ® to display EPA environmental databases and demographic/economic information to support analysis of environmental justice issues.
TSI is a part of the U.S.Department of Transportation (DOT) and was initially created in 1971 to support DOT's mission of ensuring safety and security in the nation's transportation system. They offer courses in hazardous materials transportation, hazardous waste transportation, and other forms of transportation.
Addresses inventorying chemicals, emergency planning, emergency releases, and community right-to-know.
This is a course offered to DoD students to learn proper environmental sampling technique. This include: * basic sampling techniques (grab/composite/multi-increment sampling, avoidance of cross contamination, use of preservatives, etc.) * specific sampling techniques for the following media: soil, potable water, waste water (including storm water), groundwater and hazardous waste * completion of environmental sampling paperwork (e.g. sample container labeling, field log books, chain of custody documentation) * health and safety considerations * field testing techniques (i.e. use of pH meter, conductivity / total dissolved solids meter, temperature indicator and dissolved oxygen meter) * Use of a flow-through cell for micro purging of monitoring wells.
PHMSA hosted a webinar to present the objectives of the FAQ initiative and answer questions from concerned parties. The overarching concern expressed in comments was that PHMSA may eliminate the LOI process and rescind its existing LOI. During the public webinar, PHMSA clarified that the FAQ initiative compliments the LOI process and that PHMSA has no intention of discontinuing the process to request LOI, rescinding the nearly 7,000 LOI in its database, or limiting the scope of questions PHMSA will answer in the future. The recording is from 27 June 27, 2022.
Conferences and Events
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Last Updated: September 16, 2022