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Jan. 26, 2023
EPA will host a training to provide an overview of the proposed rule to update the Agency's regulations governing the timelines and other requirements for state plans to limit pollution from existing sources under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act. It will also provide information on how to effectively engage in the regulatory process and an opportunity to ask clarifying questions. Although this training is open to the public, it will include information tailored to specific groups: communities with environmental justice concerns, tribal nations, tribal environmental professionals, and small business stakeholders.
Jan. 25, 2023
A bill to amend sections 111, 169, and 171 of the Clean Air Act to clarify when a physical change in, or change in the method of operation of, a stationary source constitutes a modification or construction. (Congressional Record: 9 January 2023 [House] Pages H97-H108)
Jan. 23, 2023
The EPA's Effluent Guidelines Program Plan 15 (Plan 15) lays out how EPA will work to protect the nation's waterways by following the science and the Clean Water Act to develop technology-based pollution limits and studies on wastewater discharges from industrial sources. This Plan focuses on evaluating the extent and nature of both nutrient and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) discharges. Plan 15 further advances EPA's commitment in the PFAS Strategic Roadmap to restrict PFAS discharges from industrial sources through a multi-faceted Effluent Limitations Guidelines program.
Jan. 23, 2023
EPA announced it is seeking public comment on its proposal to address environmental justice, climate change, and PFAS contamination in its National Enforcement and Compliance Initiatives (NECIs). Every four years, EPA selects national initiatives to focus resources on serious and widespread environmental problems where federal enforcement can make a difference. The primary objective of these initiatives is to protect human health and the environment by holding polluters accountable through enforcement and assisting regulated entities to return to compliance. EPA proposes to continue four of the six current national initiatives during the FY 2024-2027 cycle and return two of the current national initiatives to the core enforcement and compliance program. In addition, EPA proposes to address environmental justice concerns in all NECIs, and to add two new NECIs on mitigating climate change and addressing PFAS pollution, for the FY 2024-2027 cycle.
Jan. 20, 2023
Have you ever wondered why it matters if a hazardous secondary material is a solid waste? Or what you need to know to determine if something is a solid waste for purposes of RCRA hazardous waste regulation? The amount of hazardous waste regulation depends on the type of material and how it is being managed. Often, hazardous secondary materials being recycled are subject to less or no regulation.
Jan. 20, 2023
This document, updated in December 2022, describes the requirements of the RCRA organic air emission standards contained in title 40 of the CFR parts 264/265, subparts AA, BB, and CC for hazardous waste TSDFs and generators of hazardous waste.
Jan. 20, 2023
EPA initiated a rulemaking that will consider revisions to the regulations that allow for the open burning and detonation (OB/OD) of waste explosives. The allowance or "variance" to the prohibition on the open burning of hazardous waste was established at a time when there were no safe alternatives to treatment of waste explosives by OB/OD. However, recent findings from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and EPA determined that safe alternatives are now available for many energetic/explosive waste streams. Because there are safe alternatives in use that capture and treat emissions prior to release, EPA is considering revising regulations to promote the broader use of these alternatives, where applicable.
Jan. 20, 2023
EPA created a template that persons recycling hazardous secondary materials may choose to use to document their legitimacy determinations. Persons performing the recycling under the generator-controlled exclusion of 40 CFR 261.4(a)(23) must maintain documentation of their legitimacy determinations on-site. Documentation needs to include a written description of how the recycling meets the legitimate recycling factors. This template can also be used to document a claim of legitimate recycling under any other recycling exclusion or exemption.
Jan. 19, 2023
This webinar will explore how to use ECHO EPA/State dashboards. The EPA/State dashboards show a visual depiction of enforcement and compliance data as it relates to agency performance. EPA will cover examples of using the dashboards for several programs. Additionally, they will demonstrate how to utilize the modernized EPA/State dashboard functionality, highlighting new and updated interactive features.
Jan. 18, 2023
The EPA and the Department of the Army ("the agencies") are finalizing a rule defining the scope of waters protected under the Clean Water Act. In developing this rule, the agencies considered the text of the relevant provisions of the Clean Water Act and the statute as a whole, the scientific record, relevant Supreme Court case law, and the agencies' experience and technical expertise after more than 45 years of implementing the longstanding pre-2015 regulations defining "waters of the United States." This final rule advances the objective of the Clean Water Act and ensures critical protections for the nation's vital water resources, which support public health, environmental protection, agricultural activity, and economic growth across the United States. This action is effective on 20 March 2023. Whitney Beck, Oceans, Wetlands and Communities Division, Office of Water (4504-T), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460; teler: (202) 564-2281; email: CWAwotus@epa.gov. (Federal Register 18 January 2023 [Rule] Pages 3004-3144)
Jan. 13, 2023
EPA Headquarters staff will provide an overview of EPA's effluent guideline planning process as well as the contents of Effluent Guideline Plan 15, including updates on EPA's reviews of industrial wastewater discharges and treatment technologies, EPA's 2021 annual review of effluent guidelines and pre-treatment standards, and EPA's continued focus in evaluating the extent and nature of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) discharges and assess opportunities for limiting those discharges from multiple industrial categories, as outlined in EPA's 2021 PFAS Strategic Roadmap.
Jan. 12, 2023
Learn about the new functions of e-Manifesting to allow users to upload electronic signatures and be able to sign in external systems that have integrated with the e-Manifest API. This new functionality will go live 10 February 2023. Demonstrations using Quicker Sign are provided for Generator, Transporters, and Receiving Facilities.
Jan. 5, 2023
EPA recently announced a redesign and updates to the statistics webpage for the New Chemicals Review Program. The update includes additional information and metrics on the Agency's review of new chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), increasing transparency for the public, the regulated community and other stakeholders. The new information and features will help users understand EPA's new chemicals review process, throughput, and trends, while highlighting the progress the program has made despite ongoing resource challenges.
Jan. 4, 2023
EPA hosts a monthly webinar series to communicate the most current EPA research, tools, and resources related to small drinking water systems. This webpage provides links to past trainings for those interested in gaining knowledge and skills related to compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act, Building the Capacity of Drinking Water Systems, and Drinking Water Grant Opportunities.
Jan. 3, 2023
Under the Clean Air Act, the EPA is required to determine the applicable volume requirements for the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for years after those specified in the statute. This action proposes the applicable volumes and percentage standards for 2023 through 2025 for cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and total renewable fuel. This action also proposes the second supplemental standard addressing the remand of the 2016 standard-setting rulemaking. Finally, this action proposes several regulatory changes to the RFS program including regulations governing the generation of qualifying renewable electricity and other modifications intended to improve the program's implementation. Comments must be received on or before 10 February 2023. POC is David Korotney, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Assessment and Standards Division, EPA, 2000 Traverwood Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105; tele: 734-214-4507; email: RFS-Rulemakings@epa.gov. (Federal Register 30 December 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 80582-80756)
Dec. 29, 2022
During fiscal year (FY) 2022, EPA's enforcement and compliance program continued its mission to target the most serious water, air, land, and chemical violations and hazards that impact communities across the country. Their work reduced, treated or eliminated 95 million pounds of pollutants, and required violators to pay over $300 million in penalties fines and restitution. Our primary focus was advancing environmental justice (EJ), rebuilding EPA's national inspector corps, and working to mitigate the effects of climate change, particularly in communities overburdened by pollution. EPAs FY 2022 accomplishments focused on protecting vulnerable communities using the full range of compliance monitoring and enforcement tools, including inspections, technical assistance supported by advanced technologies, and early actions and innovative remedies to ensure high levels of compliance with federal environmental laws and regulations.
Dec. 29, 2022
This action finalizes amendments to the national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) for the site remediation source category. This action finalizes amendments to remove exemptions from the rule for site remediation activities performed under authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as a remedial action or a non-time-critical removal action, and for site remediation activities performed under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective actions conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This final rule is effective on 22 December 2022. POC is Matthew Witosky, Sector Policies and Programs Division (E143-05), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tele: (919) 541-2865; and email:witosky.matthew@epa.gov.(Federal Register 22 December 2022 [Rule] pages 78545-78558)
Dec. 29, 2022
This final rule corrects editorial errors and improves the clarity of certain provisions in PHMSA's program and procedural regulations and in the Hazardous Materials Regulations. The intended effect of this rulemaking is to enhance accuracy and reduce misunderstandings of the regulations. The amendments contained in this final rule are non-substantive changes and do not impose new requirements. This final rule is effective 26 January 2023. POC is Yul B. Baker Jr., Standards and Rulemaking Division, at (202) 366-8553, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, East Building, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20590-0001. (Federal Register 27 December 2022 [Rule] pages 79752-79785)
Dec. 22, 2022
EPA's detailed guidance document on how recycling and disposal of hand sanitizer is regulated and safety considerations to keep in mind. The purpose of this memo is to provide details about how RCRA hazardous waste regulations and exemptions apply to different scenarios for recycling excess alcohol-based sanitizer.
Dec. 21, 2022
EPA released the National Biennial Hazardous Waste Report data for the 2021 calendar year. Federal regulations require large quantity generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to submit reports every two years about the nature, quantities, and disposition of hazardous waste generated at their facilities.
Dec. 16, 2022
EPA has developed a collection of communication tools that can be used to promote the value of sound stormwater management for creating a community where residents want to live and work. Public works managers can use these as part of the public education and outreach efforts of their stormwater permit programs. The materials on the website are organized by the main goals of the Stormwater Smart effort. They cover a wide range of topics and can be used on several platforms.
Dec. 15, 2022
EPA is proposing to issue regulations to implement certain provisions of the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act, as enacted on 27 December 2020. This rulemaking proposes to: restrict the use of hydrofluorocarbons in specific sectors or subsectors in which they are used; establish a process for submitting technology transitions petitions; establish recordkeeping and reporting requirements; and address certain other elements related to the effective implementation of the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act. The proposed restrictions on the use of hydrofluorocarbons would, in part, address petitions granted on 7 October 2021, and 19 September 2022. The EPA is also seeking advance information on certain topics that may be helpful to developing a future proposed rule including on restrictions on the use of hydrofluorocarbons for certain other sectors and subsectors and on a third-party auditing program to verify substances used in products. Comments on this notice of proposed rulemaking must be received on or before 30 January 2023. POC is Allison Cain, Stratospheric Protection Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs (Mail Code 6205A), EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460; tele: 202-564-1566; email: cain.allison@epa.gov. (Federal Register 15 December 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 76738-76813)
Dec. 9, 2022
PHMSA hosted a webinar to present the objectives of the FAQ initiative and answer questions from concerned parties. The overarching concern expressed in comments was that PHMSA may eliminate the LOI process and rescind its existing LOI. During the public webinar, PHMSA clarified that the FAQ initiative compliments the LOI process and that PHMSA has no intention of discontinuing the process to request LOI, rescinding the nearly 7,000 LOI in its database, or limiting the scope of questions PHMSA will answer in the future. The recording is from 27 June 27, 2022.
Dec. 6, 2022
EPA is taking direct final action to clarify its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Stormwater Phase II regulations due to recent changes made by the Census Bureau. The changes to EPA's regulations are limited to clarifying that the designation criteria for small municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4s), which have been used since the promulgation of the regulations in 1999, will remain the same. These clarifications are necessary due to the Census Bureau's recent decision to discontinue its practice of publishing the location of "urbanized areas" along with the 2020 Census and future censuses. The clarification in this direct final rule replaces the term "urbanized area" in the Phase II regulations with the phrase "urban areas with a population of at least 50,000," which is the Census Bureau's longstanding definition of the term urbanized areas. This change will allow NPDES permitting authorities to use 2020 Census and future Census data in a manner that is consistent with existing longstanding regulatory practice. This rule is effective on 2 March 2023 without further notice, unless EPA receives adverse comment by 3 January 2023. POC is Heather Huddle, Water Permits Division (MC4203), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington DC 20004; tele: (202) 564-7932; email: huddle.heather@epa.gov. (Federal Register 2 December 2022 [Rule] Pages 73965-73971).
Dec. 5, 2022
EPA is proposing amendments to the Standards of Performance for secondary lead smelters per the Agency's periodic review of the new source performance standards required by the CAA. In this action, they are proposing updates to the current NSPS for secondary lead smelters and proposing a new NSPS subpart that applies to affected sources constructed, reconstructed, or modified after the date of this proposed rule. For the current NSPS subpart, they are proposing to revise the definitions of blast furnace, reverberatory furnace, and pot furnace to more closely align with the equipment definitions used in the NESHAP for secondary lead smelting. They are also proposing requirements for periodic performance tests for PM and incorporating revised monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements, including electronic reporting of performance tests, to be more consistent with the NESHAP. Please read full text for additional subpart proposals. Comments must be received on or before 17 January 2023. POC is Tonisha Dawson, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tel: (919) 541-1454; and email: dawson.tonisha@epa.gov. (Federal Register 1 December 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 73708-73722)
Dec. 2, 2022
The EPA is finalizing updates to the list of North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes subject to reporting under the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) to reflect the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 2022 NAICS code revision. OMB updates the NAICS codes every five years. EPA is implementing the 2022 codes for TRI Reporting Year 2022 (i.e., facilities reporting to TRI are required to use 2022 NAICS codes on reports that are due to the Agency by July 1, 2023). The actual data required by a TRI form does not change as a result of this rulemaking, nor does the rule affect the universe of TRI reporting facilities that are required to submit reports to the Agency under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA). This final rule is effective on 28 December 2022. Rachel Dean, Data Collection Branch, Data Gathering and Analysis Division (Mail code: 7406M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460; tele: (202) 566-1303; email: dean.rachel@epa.gov. (Federal Register 28 November 2022 [Rule] Pages 72891-72898).
Dec. 2, 2022
The November 2022 edition of The Corps Environment is now available and can be accessed online at: https://www.dvidshub.net/publication/issues/65712. This edition highlights providing environmental and economic benefits, in support of Environmental Operating Principle #3. Content includes commentary from Col. Matthew F. Kelly, commander of U.S. Army Environmental Command (USAEC), sharing his impressions after taking command and his focus on building upon USAEC's legacy. This issue also features initiatives from across the Army environmental community that are providing enduring environmental benefits around the globe.
Nov. 30, 2022
EPA is finalizing PM emission standards and test procedures applicable to certain classes of engines used by civil subsonic jet airplanes (engines with rated output of greater than 26.7 kN) to replace the existing smoke standard for those engines. The EPA is adopting these standards under our authority in the CAA. These standards and test procedures are equivalent to the engine standards adopted by the United Nations' ICAO in 2017 and 2020 and will apply to both new type design aircraft engines and in-production aircraft engines. These standards reflect the importance of the control of PM emissions and U.S. efforts to secure the highest practicable degree of uniformity in aviation regulations and standards. Additionally, the EPA is migrating, modernizing, and streamlining the existing regulations into a new part in the Code of Federal Regulations. As part of this update, the EPA is also aligning with ICAO by applying the smoke number standards to engines less than or equal to 26.7 kilonewtons rated output used on supersonic airplanes. This final rule is effective on 23 December 2022. POC is Bryan Manning, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Assessment and Standards Division (ASD), EPA, 2000 Traverwood Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105; tele:(734) 214-4832; email:manning.bryan@epa.gov. (
Nov. 30, 2022
The EPA is announcing the availability of and soliciting comment on an Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (IRFA) and Updated Economic Analysis following the completion of a Small Business Advocacy Review (SBAR) Panel for the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) proposed rule for reporting and recordkeeping requirements for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The EPA seeks public comment on all aspects of the IRFA and Updated Economic Analysis, including underlying data and assumptions in developing its estimates, as well as on certain items presented in the IRFA for public comment and related to the protection of Confidential Business Information. Comments must be received on or before 27 December 2022. POC is Stephanie Griffin, Data Gathering and Analysis Division (7406M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460-0001; telephone number: (202) 564-1463; email address: griffin.stephanie@epa.gov. (Federal Register 25 November 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 72439-72441).
Nov. 29, 2022
The Media Kit, developed by EPA, features communications resources to educate followers, viewers and others about the risks of lead exposure, how to find and hire lead-safe certified contractors and using DIY lead-safe work practices during renovation projects on pre-1978 homes.
Nov. 17, 2022
EPA issued a supplemental proposed rule modifying and adjusting certain aspects of the fees rule established under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). EPA is publishing these changes to ensure that collected fees provide the Agency with 25% of authorized TSCA costs consistent with direction in the FY 2022 appropriations bill to consider the "full" implementation costs of the law. Updating TSCA fees will strengthen EPA's ability to successfully implement TSCA in a way that's both protective and sustainable and significantly improve on-time performance and quality.
Nov. 14, 2022
EPA is issuing the Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) which is a list of contaminants in drinking water that are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations. In addition, these contaminants are known or anticipated to occur in public water systems and may require regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). This list is the Fifth Contaminant Candidate List (CCL 5) published by the agency since the SDWA amendments of 1996. CCL 5 includes 66 chemicals, 3 chemical groups (cyanotoxins, disinfection byproducts (DBPs), and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)), and 12 microbial contaminants. Final rule issued 14 November 2022. POC is For information on chemical contaminants contact Kesha Forrest, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Standards and Risk Management Division, at (202) 564-3632 or email forrest.kesha@epa.gov. (Federal Register 14 November 2022 [Rule] Pages 68060-68085).
Nov. 10, 2022
This action finalizes the technology review conducted for the paint stripping and miscellaneous surface coating operations area source categories regulated under national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP). These final amendments also address provisions regarding electronic reporting; make miscellaneous clarifying and technical corrections; simplify the petition for exemption process; and clarify requirements for emissions during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction (SSM). We are making no revisions to the numerical emission limits based on the technology review. This final rule is effective on 10 November 2022. POC is Lisa Sutton, Sector Policies and Programs Division (D243-04), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tele: (919) 541-3450; fax: (919) 541-4991; and email:sutton.lisa@epa.gov. (Federal Register 10 November 2022 [Rule] Pages 67791-67807)
Nov. 4, 2022
EPA is proposing to amend existing regulations to implement certain provisions of the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act, as enacted on 27 December 2020. This rulemaking proposes to establish the methodology for allocating hydrofluorocarbon production and consumption allowances for the calendar years of 2024 through 2028. EPA is also proposing to amend the consumption baseline to reflect updated data and to make other adjustments based on lessons learned from implementation of the hydrofluorocarbon phasedown program thus far, including proposing to: codify the existing approach of how allowances must be expended for import of regulated substances; revise recordkeeping and reporting requirements; and implement other modifications to the existing regulations. Comments on this notice of proposed rulemaking must be received on or before 19 December 2022. POC is John Feather, EPA, Stratospheric Protection Division, tele: 202-564-1230; or email: feather.john@epa.gov. (Federal Register 3 November 2022 [Notice] Pages 66372-66409).
Nov. 3, 2022
EPA published the Final Fifth Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL 5), which will serve as the basis for EPA's regulatory considerations over the next five-year cycle under the Safe Drinking Water Act. This update includes a substantial expansion of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), an important first step towards identifying additional PFAS that may require regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act. In addition to a group of PFAS, the Final CCL 5 includes 66 individually listed chemicals, two additional chemical groups (cyanotoxins and disinfection byproducts (DBPs)), and 12 microbes.
Nov. 3, 2022
The EPA developed this Strategy to Reduce Lead Exposures and Disparities in U.S. Communities (Lead Strategy) to lay out an all-of-EPA plan to strengthen public health protections, address legacy lead contamination for communities with the greatest exposures, and promote environmental justice and equity.
Nov. 3, 2022
The plan represents an ambitious effort to deploy resources from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law while leveraging every tool across federal, state, and local government to deliver clean drinking water, replace lead pipes, and remediate lead paint. The plan includes over 15 new actions from more than 10 federal agencies that ensure the federal government is marshalling every resource to make rapid progress towards replacing all lead pipes in the next decade.
Oct. 28, 2022
WASHINGTON (October 28, 2022) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its Strategy to Reduce Lead Exposures and Disparities in U.S. Communities (Lead Strategy), in conjunction with National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week. This first-ever, agency-wide Lead Strategy outlines how EPA will utilize its full suite of authorities, expertise, and resources to reduce lead exposure in communities overburdened by pollution and advance the Biden-Harris Administration's commitment to environmental justice and equity. The efforts outlined in the strategy to protect the public from lead pollution are supported by the historic investments under President Biden's Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.
Oct. 27, 2022
WASHINGTON (October 27, 2022) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its Lagoon Wastewater Treatment Action Plan and announced nearly $2 million in research grant funding to accelerate innovative and alternative wastewater treatment technologies in lagoon and pond systems serving small communities. Through research grants and the first ever Action Plan, EPA is providing equitable, accessible, and coordinated technical and financial programs, resources, and assistance that will help improve public health and clean waterway protections for rural, small, and Tribal communities that rely on lagoon wastewater treatment systems.
Oct. 27, 2022
WASHINGTON (October 27, 2022) -- As part of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, EPA has released its 2022 Lead Enforcement Bulletin, which highlights the most notable lead enforcement cases during the past fiscal year. EPA pursued both civil and criminal cases for violations of federal laws to prevent and reduce exposure to lead in paint, drinking water, soils, hazardous waste and other environmental sources. Many of the enforcement actions and activities highlighted in the Lead Enforcement Bulletin address lead exposures in communities disproportionately impacted by lead and areas with environmental justice concerns.
Oct. 27, 2022
This practical guide helps healthcare facilities, including hospitals, surgery centers, and urgent care facilities, understand the applicable regulations so they can develop compliant, holistic, and cost-effective pharmaceutical waste management programs. The primary focus is to help healthcare facilities understand EPA's hazardous waste regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as they apply to hazardous waste pharmaceuticals, but other regulations are also discussed.
Oct. 20, 2022
WASHINGTON (Oct. 20, 2022) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced additional actions to phase down climate-damaging hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), a crucial component of President Biden's ambitious agenda to combat the climate crisis while advancing American manufacturing and innovation. EPA today issued a proposed rule to implement the next step of the nation's HFC phasedown, an ambitious 40% reduction below historic levels starting in 2024. The proposal follows the Senate's bipartisan approval to ratify the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, a global agreement to phase down HFCs and avoid up to 0.5?C of global warming by the end of this century.
Oct. 17, 2022
EPA is proposing to repeal regulatory amendments promulgated through a final rule adopted in 2008 under the CAA that addressed the consideration of "fugitive" emissions of air pollutants from stationary sources when determining the applicability of certain permitting requirements under the Act. Those amendments have been stayed as a result of the reconsideration process. To bring closure to the reconsideration proceeding, the EPA is proposing to fully repeal the 2008 rule by removing the stayed provisions of the regulatory amendments adopted in 2008. The EPA is also proposing to remove a related exemption for modifications that would be considered major solely due to the inclusion of fugitive emissions. As a result of the proposed changes, all existing major stationary sources would be required to include fugitive emissions in determining whether a physical or operational change constitutes a "major modification," requiring a permit under the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) or Nonattainment New Source Review (NNSR) programs. Comments must be received on or before 13 December 2022. POC is Matthew Spangler, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (C504-05), EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC; tel: (919) 541-0327; email: spangler.matthew@epa.gov. (Federal Register 14 October 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 62322-62337)
Oct. 11, 2022
EPA is finalizing actions pursuant to section 181(b)(2) of the CAA for most remaining areas in the country classified as "Serious" for the 2008 8-hour ozone NAAQS of 0.075 ppm. Applying a uniform methodology, the Agency is determining that one Serious area attained the standards by the 20 July 2021, applicable attainment date and that five Serious areas failed to attain the standards by the applicable attainment date. Pursuant to its authority under the CAA, the EPA is establishing new, consistent deadlines by which the responsible state air agencies for the reclassified areas must submit SIP revisions and implement controls to satisfy the statutory and regulatory requirements for Severe areas for the 2008 ozone NAAQS. Additionally, in areas reclassified as Severe, where not already prohibited, the CAA will prohibit the sale of conventional gasoline and require that federal reformulated gasoline instead be sold beginning 1 year after the effective date of this final rule, 7 November 2023. The effective date of this rule is 7 November 2022. POC is Robert Lingard, EPA, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Air Quality Policy Division, C539-01 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; by tele: 919-541-5272; email: lingard.robert@epa.gov. (Federal Register 7 October 2022 [Rule] Pages 60926-60938)
Oct. 7, 2022
Beginning in 2015, petroleum refineries were required to install air monitors around the perimeter of their facilities. Petroleum refineries must monitor benzene concentrations and report the results to EPA on a quarterly basis. The Dashboard improves public access to program data concerning benzene emissions along refinery fencelines and allows for a more detailed analysis of that data. Public access to this information advances public transparency and environmental justice.
Oct. 6, 2022
This action finalizes amendments to the national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) at major sources from new and existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers and process heaters. Certain aspects of these standards were challenged and subsequently remanded to the Agency by the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (D.C. Circuit). This action finalizes amendments to several numeric emission limits for new and existing boilers and process heaters consistent with the court's opinion and sets compliance dates for these new emission limits. This action also provides further explanation of one aspect of the Agency's use of carbon monoxide (CO) as a surrogate for organic hazardous air pollutants (HAP) and its use of a CO threshold to represent the application of the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) for organic HAP. We are also finalizing several technical clarifications and corrections. This final rule is effective on 5 December 2022. POC is Lisa Thompson, Sector Policies and Programs Division (D243-01), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tel: (919) 541-9775; and email: thompson.lisa@epa.gov. (Federal Register 6 October 2022 [Rule] Pages 60816-60865)
Sep. 30, 2022
EPA announced the results of a study that estimates the economic benefits of cleaning up facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action program. EPA's analyses of 79 cleanups revealed that these facilities support 1,028 on-site businesses, which provide economic benefits including: $39 billion in annual sales revenue; over 82,000 jobs; and $7.9 billion in estimated annual employment income. EPA also developed brief profiles for more than 40 facilities to showcase the economic benefits that can be fostered through RCRA Corrective Action cleanups.
Sep. 22, 2022
The Coast Guard is proposing to align the Liquid Chemical Categorization tables with the 2020 Edition of the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk and the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee's Circular 25. The updated tables would provide a list of the liquid hazardous materials and liquefied and compressed gases approved for international and domestic maritime transportation, and indicate how each substance is categorized by its pollution potential, safe carriage requirements, chemical flammability, combustibility, and compatibility with other substances. This proposed rule would impose no additional costs to chemical shippers or vessel owners. Comments and related material must be received by the Coast Guard on or before 21 December 2022. POC is Dr. Raghunath Halder, U.S. Coast Guard Hazardous Materials Division (CG-ENG-5); tel 202-372-1422, email Raghunath.Halder@uscg.mil. (Federal Register 22 September 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 57984-58018).
Sep. 15, 2022
This tool assists emergency managers and planners in the public and private sectors in creating or updating a comprehensive plan for managing materials and wastes generated from manmade and natural disasters. The tool walks the user through the process of developing and implementing a plan. The tool also contains many resources that can be used as aids to various aspects of the planning process.
Sep. 15, 2022
This Guide summarizes the current state of the recycling exclusions promulgated under EPA's DSW rulemakings. The litigation history around the DSW rulemakings from 2008 to 2018, coupled with a state's ability to be more stringent than the federal requirements, has resulted in a complex national landscape for this exclusion. This Guide explains that complexity.
Sep. 8, 2022
EPA's FY 2022-2026 Strategic Plan communicates the Agency's priorities and provides the roadmap for achieving its mission to protect human health and the environment. In this Strategic Plan, the Agency renews its commitment to four principles which are: follow the science, follow the law, be transparent, and advance justice and equity.
Sep. 6, 2022
Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended ("CERCLA" or "Superfund"), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is proposing to designate perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), including their salts and structural isomers, as hazardous substances. CERCLA authorizes the Administrator to promulgate regulations designating as hazardous substances such elements, compounds, mixtures, solutions, and substances which, when released into the environment, may present substantial danger to the public health or welfare or the environment. Such a designation would ultimately facilitate cleanup of contaminated sites and reduce human exposure to these "forever" chemicals. Comments must be received on or before 7 November 2022. POC is Michelle Schutz, Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (5202T), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460; tele:703-346-9536; email: schutz.michelle@epa.gov. (Federal Register 6 September 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 54415-54442)
Aug. 31, 2022
The EPA is proposing to amend its Risk Management Program (RMP) regulations as a result of Agency review. The proposed revisions include several changes and amplifications to the accident prevention program requirements, enhancements to the emergency preparedness requirements, increased public availability of chemical hazard information, and several other changes to certain regulatory definitions or points of clarification. These proposed amendments seek to improve chemical process safety; assist in planning, preparedness, and responding to RMP-reportable accidents; and improve public awareness of chemical hazards at regulated sources. Comments must be received on or before 31 October 2022. POC is Deanne Grant, Office of Emergency Management, Mail Code 5104A, EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460; tele: 202-564-1096; email: grant.deanne@epa.gov. (Federal Register 31 August 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 53556-53616).
Aug. 31, 2022
(Washington, August 31, 2022) Today, the Biden Administration took a major step forward in achieving the goals of President Biden's Federal Sustainability Plan and Executive Order (E.O.) 14057 Catalyzing Clean Energy Industries and Jobs Through Federal Sustainability by issuing E.O. 14057 Implementing Instructions to Federal agencies.

Through President Biden's historic Executive Order 14057 Catalyzing Clean Energy Industries and Jobs Through Federal Sustainability the U.S. Federal Government leads the world by example again – transforming how it builds, buys, and manages to help make America's economy cleaner, more efficient, and more sustainable.

Aug. 31, 2022
The August 2022 edition of The Corps Environment is now available and can be accessed online at: https://www.dvidshub.net/publication/issues/64976. This edition highlights employing an open and transparent process, in support of Environmental Operating Principle #7. Content within this issue recognizes our U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) environmental and sustainability champions and features initiatives from across the Army environmental community that are providing environmental benefits across the globe.
Aug. 17, 2022
This action announces the EPA's approval of alternative testing methods for use in measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water to determine compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water Act authorizes EPA to approve the use of alternative testing methods through publication in the Federal Register. EPA is using this streamlined authority to make seven additional methods available for analyzing drinking water samples. This expedited approach provides public water systems, laboratories, and primacy agencies with more timely access to new measurement techniques and greater flexibility in the selection of analytical methods, thereby reducing monitoring costs while maintaining public health protection. This action is effective 17 August 2022. POC Glynda Smith, Technical Support Center, Standards and Risk Management Division, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (MS 140), Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268; tel: (513) 569-7652; email address: smith.glynda@epa.gov. Click here for details.
Aug. 17, 2022
The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is correcting a final rule that was published in the Federal Register on 26 July 2022. The final rule was published to maintain alignment with international regulations and standards by adopting various amendments, including changes to proper shipping names, hazard classes, packing groups, special provisions, packaging authorizations, air transport quantity limitations, and vessel stowage requirements. This correction is effective 25 August 2022. Candace Casey, Standards and Rulemaking, Steven Andrews, Standards and Rulemaking, or Aaron Wiener, International Program, at (202) 366-8553, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, East Building, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20590-0001. (Federal Register 16 August 2022 [Rule] Pages 50271-50273).
Aug. 15, 2022
(Honolulu, August 11, 2022) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement with the U.S. Marine Corps to make improvements related to stormwater discharges at the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) located on the Mokapu Peninsula of Kaneohe, Oahu.
Aug. 11, 2022
The EPA is amending the CFR to reflect a 2015 court decision regarding the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (RICE) and the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The court vacated provisions in the regulations specifying that emergency engines could operate for emergency demand response or during periods where there is a deviation of voltage or frequency. This ministerial rule revises the RICE NESHAP and ICE NSPS to conform to the court's decision. This final rule is effective on 10 August 2022. For questions about this action, contact Melanie King, Sector Policies and Programs Division (D243-01), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tel: (919) 541-2469; and email: king.melanie@epa.gov. (Federal Register 10 August 2022 [Rule] Pages 48603-48608)
Jul. 29, 2022
Pursuant to the EPA's Significant New Alternatives Policy program, this action proposes to list certain substances as acceptable subject to use conditions in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector for chillers--comfort cooling, residential dehumidifiers, non-residential dehumidifiers, residential and light commercial air conditioning and heat pumps, and a substance as acceptable subject to use conditions and narrowed used limits in very low temperature refrigeration. Through this action, EPA is proposing to incorporate by reference standards which establish requirements for electrical air conditioners, heat pumps, and dehumidifiers, laboratory equipment containing refrigerant, safe use of flammable refrigerants, and safe design, construction, installation, and operation of refrigeration systems. Additionally, this action proposes to list certain substances as acceptable subject to use conditions in the fire suppression sector for certain streaming and total flooding uses. Finally, EPA requests advance comment on.... Comments must be received on or before 12 September 2022. POC is Holly Tapani, Stratospheric Protection Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs (Mail Code 6205T), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460; tele: 202-564-0679; email: tapani.holly@epa.gov. (Federal Register 28 July 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 45508-45562).
Jul. 26, 2022
PHMSA is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to maintain alignment with international regulations and standards by adopting various amendments, including changes to proper shipping names, hazard classes, packing groups, special provisions, packaging authorizations, air transport quantity limitations, and vessel stowage requirements. Additionally, PHMSA is amending the HMR to allow for better alignment with Transport Canada's Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations. PHMSA is also withdrawing the unpublished 1 October 2020, Notice of Enforcement Policy Regarding International Standards on use of select updated international standards in complying with the HMR during the pendency of this rulemaking. This rule is effective 25 August 2022. POC is Candace Casey, Standards and Rulemaking, Steven Andrews, Standards and Rulemaking, or Aaron Wiener, International Program, at (202) 366-8553, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, East Building, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20590-0001. (Federal Register 26 July 2022 [Rule] Pages 44944-45001)
Jul. 22, 2022
EPA is proposing to update the list of North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes subject to reporting under the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) to reflect the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 2022 NAICS code revision. OMB updates the NAICS codes every five years. EPA currently uses 2017 NAICS codes and is proposing to implement the 2022 codes for TRI Reporting Year 2022 (i.e., facilities reporting to TRI would be required to use 2022 NAICS codes on reports that are due to the Agency by July 1, 2023). The actual data required by a TRI form will not change as a result of this rulemaking, nor will the rule affect the universe of TRI reporting facilities that are required to submit reports to the Agency under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA). Comments must be received on or before 20 September 2022. POC is Rachel Dean, Data Collection Branch, Data Gathering and Analysis Division (Mailcode: 7406M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460; telephone number: (202) 566-1303; email address: dean.rachel@epa.gov. (Federal Register 22 July 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 43772-43779)
Jul. 6, 2022
EPA is releasing the final scope document for the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Risk Evaluation for Asbestos Part 2: Supplemental Evaluation Including Legacy Uses and Associated Disposals of Asbestos. The final scope document explains EPA's plan for part 2 of the risk evaluation for asbestos, including the conditions of use, hazards, exposures, and the potentially exposed or susceptible subpopulations EPA will consider in the risk evaluation. EPA determined that the risk evaluation for asbestos would be issued in two parts. EPA completed part 1 of the risk evaluation for the ongoing uses of chrysotile asbestos in December 2020. EPA is evaluating legacy uses and associated disposals, other types of asbestos fibers in addition to chrysotile, and conditions of use of asbestos-containing talc in a supplemental effort that is the focus of part 2 of the risk evaluation for asbestos. Legacy uses are those uses for which there is no ongoing or prospective manufacturing, processing, or distribution for use.
Jun. 27, 2022
This information bulletin is intended to make Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit writers, inspectors, and the regulated community aware of controls, conditions and sampling practices to ensure and determine compliance with RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs). LDRs include testing and recordkeeping requirements, treatment standards, various prohibitions and other conditions that ensure hazardous wastes are adequately treated before disposal, thereby minimizing impact on human health and the environment. This document is based on existing regulatory requirements, longstanding guidance, and formal policy, and provides an overview of the basis of LDR requirements. It focuses on strategies that permit writers and facilities can use to improve RCRA permits and Waste Analysis Plans (WAPs), as well as provides inspectors with tools to better determine compliance with LDRs
Jun. 23, 2022
This webinar addresses the Lead Paint Disclosure and RRP rule requirements applicable to DOD housing, other federal facilities and their contractors. The presenters cover the critical regulatory and compliance requirements of these rules, as well as BMPs that help achieve and maintain compliance.
Jun. 21, 2022
EPA is proposing to amend specific provisions in the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule to improve the quality and consistency of the data collected under the rule, streamline and improve implementation, and clarify or propose minor updates to certain provisions that have been the subject of questions from reporting entities. These proposed changes include revisions to improve the existing calculation, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements by incorporating updates to existing emissions estimation methodologies and providing for collection of additional data to understand new source categories or new emission sources for specific sectors. The EPA is also proposing revisions that would improve implementation of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule such as updates to applicability estimation methodologies, providing flexibility for or simplifying calculation and monitoring methodologies, streamlining recordkeeping and reporting, and other minor technical corrections or clarifications. Comments must be received on or before 22 August 2022. POC is Jennifer Bohman, Climate Change Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs (MC-6207A), EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460; tel: (202) 343-9548; email address:GHGReporting@epa.gov. (Federal Register 21 June 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 36920-37119).
Jun. 10, 2022
The EPA is proposing amendments to the NESHAP for Gasoline Distribution facilities and the Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals. The EPA is proposing to revise NESHAP requirements for storage tanks, loading operations, and equipment leaks to reflect cost-effective developments in practices, process, or controls. The EPA is also proposing New Source Performance Standards to reflect best system of emissions reduction for loading operations and equipment leaks. In addition, the EPA is proposing revisions related to emissions during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction; to add requirements for electronic reporting of performance test results, performance evaluation reports, and compliance reports; to revise monitoring and operating requirements for control devices; and to make other minor technical improvements. We estimate that these proposed amendments would reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants from this source category by 2,220 tons per year (tpy) and would reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds by 45,400 tpy. Comments must be received on or before 9 August 2022. POC is Mr. Neil Feinberg, Sector Policies and Programs Division (E143-01), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tel: (919) 541-2214 and email: feinberg.stephen@epa.gov. (Federal Register 10 June 2022 [Proposed Rule] pages 35608-35642).
May. 23, 2022
This edition highlights protecting and preserving our environment, in support of Environmental Operating Principle #4. Content includes commentary from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Environmental Community of Practice leadership, discussing how our actions are directly connected to the environment and shaping a sustainable future. This issue also features initiatives from across the Army environmental community that are protecting and preserving our environment for current and future generations.
Included in this issue:
– U.S. Army Environmental Command highlights the recipients of the Secretary of the Army and Secretary of Defense environmental awards.
– USACE Honolulu District shares how they removed thousands of unexploded ordnances in Saipan.
– USACE St. Paul District discusses progress being made under the Upper Mississippi River Restoration program.
– USACE Charleston District highlights a day in the life of a USACE regulatory project manager.
– U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center shares how they are working to address energy and water resiliency.
– USACE Far East District discusses how their stormwater pollution prevention measures are keeping waterways clean.
May. 11, 2022
Pursuant to the EPA's SNAP program, this action lists the refrigerant 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoroprop-1-ene, also known as HFO-1234yf or R-1234yf, as acceptable, subject to use conditions, in the motor vehicle air conditioning end-use for certain types of newly manufactured nonroad vehicles, which includes some vehicles that are also considered heavy-duty vehicles. In addition, EPA is requiring unique servicing fittings for use with small refrigerant cans (two pounds or less) of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoroprop-1-ene that are used to service onroad and nonroad vehicles. Finally, EPA is adding a reference to the Agency's regulations under the Toxic Substances Control Act for 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoroprop-1-ene for the listings in nonroad vehicles and previous listings for certain onroad vehicles. This final rule is effective on 3 June 2022. POC is Chenise Farquharson, Stratospheric Protection Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs (Mail Code 6205 T), EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460; tel: 202-564-7768; email: farquharson.chenise@epa.gov. (Federal Register 4 May 2022 [Rule] Pages 26276-26295).
May. 9, 2022
EPA announced a proposed rule that would require comprehensive reporting on asbestos as the agency continues its work to address exposure to the known carcinogen and strengthen the science used to protect people from this dangerous chemical. The proposed rule under section 8(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) would require asbestos manufacturers and processors to report certain use and exposure information, including information pertaining to asbestos-containing articles (including as an impurity). EPA would use data collected through this proposed rule to help inform future actions involving asbestos, including the ongoing risk evaluation for "legacy uses" of asbestos (part two) and potential future risk management activities resulting from that risk evaluation. For example, data collected on asbestos as an impurity could better inform the risk evaluation of the use of asbestos in talc. Additionally, EPA's completed risk evaluation of ongoing asbestos uses (part one) included uses where asbestos may be part of an article, or a component of an end use product, like brake blocks and gaskets. This proposed reporting rule would help identify if there are articles that contain different types of asbestos.
May. 9, 2022
As directed by President Biden's executive order, the Justice Department and EPA developed a strategy that positions the Biden-Harris Administration to leverage all available legal tools to secure protections for communities that have been overburdened by pollution and environmental injustices. This includes restoring Supplemental Environmental Projects (SEPs), which EPA's enforcement program has used to provide environmental and/or public health benefits to communities harmed by environmental violations. In the development of this strategy, EPA and the Justice Department engaged in listening sessions to hear directly from impacted communities and other stakeholders. This feedback was critical in shaping today's EJ announcements. A Supplemental Environmental Project is an enforcement tool that EPA used for more than 30 years until the previous administration brought it to a halt. SEPs are local projects that defendants can agree to undertake as part of an enforcement case settlement to help rectify environmental violations. SEPs help to fulfill the goals of the underlying statutes being enforced and can provide important environmental and public health benefits to communities that have been harmed by environmental violations.
Apr. 27, 2022
Strengthening the Nation's Forests, Communities, and Local Economies
April 27, 2022
This EO directs federal agencies to pursue science-based, sustainable forest and land management; conserve America's mature and old-growth forests on Federal lands; invest in forest health and restoration; support indigenous traditional ecological knowledge and cultural and subsistence practices; honor Tribal treaty rights; and deploy climate-smart forestry practices and other nature-based solutions to improve the resilience of our lands, waters, wildlife, and communities in the face of increasing disturbances and chronic stress arising from climate impacts.
Apr. 6, 2022
EPA is taking action to protect people from asbestos exposure by releasing a proposed rule to prohibit ongoing uses of the only known form of asbestos currently imported into the U.S. This proposed rule is the first-ever risk management rule issued under the new process for evaluating and addressing the safety of existing chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that was enacted in 2016. The proposed rule would ban chrysotile asbestos, the only known form of asbestos that's currently imported into the U.S., which is found in products like asbestos diaphragms, sheet gaskets, brake blocks, aftermarket automotive brakes/linings, other vehicle friction products, and other gaskets also imported into the U.S.
Mar. 24, 2022
The Coast Guard announces the availability of the final policy letter that describes type-approval testing methods, and the acceptance process for such methods, for ballast water management systems (BWMS) that render organisms nonviable in ballast water. At this time, the Coast Guard does not accept any type-approval testing methods for ballast water management systems that render organisms in ballast water nonviable (meaning "permanently incapable of reproduction"). In consideration of public comments on the draft policy letter, this final policy letter establishes the mechanism for reviewing and integrating viability testing methods into the existing Coast Guard type-approval testing program. The Coast Guard invites submissions of viability testing methods in accordance with the policy letter at any time following publication. The Coast Guard will review any provided information responsive to the policy letter and enclosure. This final policy letter is subject to revision, in coordination with the EPA, contingent on any Coast Guard determination that a viability testing method is acceptable. The final policy letter announced in this notification is issued as of 28 February 2022. POC is Mr. Matthew Reudelhuber, Environmental Standards Division, tel: 202-372-1432. (Federal Register 24 March 2022 [Rule] Pages 16641-16651)
Mar. 23, 2022
ECHO Notify provides weekly email notifications of changes to enforcement and compliance data in ECHO. Notifications are tailored to the geographic locations, facility IDs, and notification options that you select. ECHO Notify provides information on all EPA enforcement and compliance activities as well as activities of state and local governments under the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and the Safe Drinking Water Act.
Mar. 22, 2022
PHMSA is announcing an initiative to convert historical letters of interpretation (LOI) applicable to the Hazardous Materials Regulations that have been issued to specific stakeholders into broadly applicable frequently asked questions on its website. By creating a repository of frequently asked questions, PHMSA seeks to eliminate the need for recurring requests for common letters of interpretations. This Federal Register Notice introduces this initiative and its objectives to those subject to the Hazardous Materials Regulations. PHMSA's objective is to gain insight regarding the utility of this initiative and topics to prioritize in the development of future frequently asked questions. PHMSA requests comment on the initiative and input on the prioritization of future sets of frequently asked questions.
Mar. 16, 2022
REMINDER: Registration to attend the 2022 Federal Environmental Symposium is now open! Federal employees and sponsored contractors are invited to attend the Symposium, hosted by NIH as a virtual event on March 28-31, 2022. The theme of this year's event is "Mission, Environment and Our Community". The event is FREE and registration will end Friday, March 18, 2022, so mark your calendar and register now. For more information, please see the Symposium website at https://www.fedcenter.gov/fes2022.
Mar. 10, 2022
EPA reinstated California's authority under the Clean Air Act to implement its own greenhouse gas (GHG) emission standards and zero emission vehicle (ZEV) sales mandate. This action concludes the agency's reconsideration of 2019's Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient Vehicles Rule Part One: One National Program Rule (SAFE-1) by finding that the actions taken under the previous administration as a part of SAFE-1 were decided in error and are now entirely rescinded. With this action, EPA is also withdrawing the SAFE-1 interpretation of the Clean Air Act that would prohibit other states from adopting the California GHG emission standards. As a result, other states may choose to adopt and enforce California's GHG emission standards in lieu of the Federal standards, consistent with section 177 of the Clean Air Act.
Mar. 9, 2022
EPA is finalizing amendments to the NESHAP for Stationary Combustion Turbines. This final action removes the stay of the effectiveness of the standards for new lean premix and diffusion flame gas-fired turbines that was promulgated in 2004. The final rule is effective on 9 March 2022. For questions about this action, contact Melanie King, Sector Policies and Programs Division (D243-01), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; telephone: (919) 541-2469; and email: king.melanie@epa.gov. (Federal Register 9 March 2022 [Rule] Pages 13183-13192)
Feb. 23, 2022
This proposal presents the results of the EPA's review of the NSPS for Lead Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants and the TR for the NESHAP for Lead Acid Battery Manufacturing Area Sources as required under the CAA. The EPA is proposing revised Pb emission limits for grid casting, paste mixing, and lead reclamation operations for both the area source NESHAP (for new and existing sources) and under a new NSPS subpart (for lead acid battery facilities that begin construction, reconstruction, or modification after February 23, 2022). Comments must be received on or before 25 April 2022. POC: Amanda Hansen, Sector Policies and Programs Division (D243-02), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tel: (919) 541-3165; and email: hansen.amanda@epa.gov. (Federal Register: 23 February 2022 [Proposed Rule] Pages 10134-10158)
Feb. 14, 2022
In this action, the EPA is finalizing technical revisions and clarifications for the NESHAP for MSW Landfills established in the 26 March 2020, final rule. This final rule also amends the MSW Landfills NSPS at 40 CFR part 60, subpart XXX, to clarify and align the timing of compliance for certain requirements involving installation of a gas collection and control system (GCCS) under related MSW landfill rules. Additionally, the EPA is revising the definition of Administrator in the MSW Landfills Federal Plan that was promulgated on 21 May 2021 to clarify who has the authority to implement and enforce the applicable requirements. The EPA is also making some minor typographical corrections. The final rule is effective 14 February 2022. POC is Andy Sheppard, Sector Policies and Programs Division (E143-03), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tele: (919) 541-4161 and email: sheppard.andy@epa.gov. (Federal Register 14 February 2022 [Rule] Pages 8197-8205)
Jan. 25, 2022
Section 7321 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (NDAA) immediately added certain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to the list of chemicals covered by the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) under Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and provided a framework for additional PFAS to be added to TRI on an annual basis. TRI data are reported to EPA annually by facilities in certain industry sectors, including federal facilities, that manufacture, process, or otherwise use TRI-listed chemicals above certain quantities. The data include quantities of such chemicals that were released into the environment or otherwise managed as waste. Information collected through the TRI allows communities to learn how facilities in their area are managing listed chemicals. The data collected also help inform EPA's efforts to better understand the listed substances.
Jan. 14, 2022
EPA is promulgating this final rule to adjust the level of the maximum (and minimum) statutory civil monetary penalty amounts under the statutes the EPA administers. This action is mandated by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended through the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 ("the 2015 Act"). The 2015 Act prescribes a formula for annually adjusting the statutory maximum (and minimum) amount of civil monetary penalties to reflect inflation, maintain the deterrent effect of statutory civil monetary penalties, and promote compliance with the law. The rule does not establish specific civil monetary penalty amounts the EPA may seek. The EPA's civil penalty policies, which guide enforcement personnel on how to exercise the EPA's discretion within statutory penalty authorities, take into account a number of fact-specific considerations. This final rule is effective 12 January 2022. POC is David Smith-Watts, Office of Civil Enforcement, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, Mail Code 2241A, EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460, tel: (202) 564-4083; email: smith-watts.david@epa.gov. (Federal Register 12 January 2022 [Rule] Pages 1676-1679)
Jan. 10, 2022
ABSTRACT SUBMITTAL DEADLINE EXTENDED TO FRIDAY JAN. 14th:The Federal sustainability community is cordially invited to attend the 2022 Federal Environmental Symposium, March 28-31, 2022. This year's theme is Mission, Environment, and Our Communities, and will be conducted via webinar-format only. The four day event will focus on Federal sustainability initiatives over the past year while encouraging partnerships, sharing of information, and best practices amongst Federal facilities. The event schedule, registration instructions, call for presentation abstracts (now open until Friday, January 14th), and continuous updates to the event can be found on the Symposium website.
Jan. 5, 2022
EPA is amending the list of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) under Clean Air Act (CAA) to add 1-bromopropane (1-BP) in response to public petitions previously granted by the EPA. This action amends the list of hazardous air pollutants initially listed under the CAA. This final rule is effective on 4 February 2022.POC is Susan Miller, Sector Policies and Programs Division (D205-02), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, tel: (919) 541-2443; email: miller.susan@epa.gov. (Federal Register 5 January 2022 [Rule] Pages 393-396)
Dec. 29, 2021
WASHINGTON (Dec. 28, 2021) -- In 2021, under the new leadership of the Biden-Harris Administration and Administrator Michael S. Regan, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took significant steps forward in tackling the climate crisis, advancing environmental justice, protecting the health and safety of communities across the country, and restoring scientific integrity.
Dec. 28, 2021
EPA is finalizing a Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) rule that requires certain public water systems (PWSs) to collect national occurrence data for 29 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and lithium. Subject to the availability of appropriations, EPA will include all systems serving 3,300 or more people and a representative sample of 800 systems serving 25 to 3,299 people. If EPA does not receive the appropriations needed for monitoring all of these systems in a given year, EPA will reduce the number of systems serving 25 to 10,000 people that will be asked to perform monitoring. This final rule is a key action to ensure science-based decision-making and prioritize protection of disadvantaged communities in accordance with EPA's PFAS Strategic Roadmap. EPA is also announcing plans for public webinars to discuss implementation of the fifth Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR 5). This final rule is effective on 26 January 2022. The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in this final rule is approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of 26 January 2022. POC is Brenda D. Bowden, Standards and Risk Management Division (SRMD), Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) (MS 140), EPA, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268; tel: (513) 569-7961; email: bowden.brenda@epa.gov. (Federal Register 27 December 2021 [Rule] Pages 73131-73157).
Dec. 22, 2021
This course seeks to enhance the knowledge and skills of emergency management agencies (EMAs) and drinking water and wastewater utilities (water sector) to enable more effective cross-sector relationships. Upon competition of this course the attendee will be able to: Identify and define key actors in the water and emergency services sectors; Understand the landscape for both drinking- and wastewater utilities; Identify water or wastewater service disruptions and possible impacts; Understand recommended preparedness and coordination activities based on AWIA; Understand the benefits of relationship building between sectors; Identify immediate action items to improve the overall response effort of drinking water and wastewater utilities and EMAs; Understand the importance of increasing coordinating between drinking water and wastewater utilities and EMAs; and Identify key actors and action items for improving preparedness and response before and during an emergency.
Dec. 17, 2021
On 16 June 2021, EPA published decision to delay the effective and compliance dates of the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR), published on 15 January 2021, to allow time for EPA to review the rule in accordance with Presidential directives issued on 20 January 2021, to the heads of Federal agencies to review certain regulations, and conduct important consultations with affected parties. EPA has completed its review. The agency's review included virtual public engagements from a diverse set of stakeholders. This document describes the comments conveyed by stakeholders, EPA's decision to proceed with a proposed rule that would revise certain key sections of the LCRR while allowing the rule to take effect, and other non-regulatory actions that EPA and other Federal agencies can take to reduce exposure to lead in drinking water. The effective date of the LCRR published on 16 June 2021, in the Federal Register (86 FR 31939), is 16 December 2021, and compliance date continues to be 16 October 2024. Primacy revision applications are due on 18 December 2023. POC is Jeffrey Kempic, Standards and Risk Management Division, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Mail Code 4607M, Washington, DC 20460; tel: (202) 564-4880; email address: kempic.jeffrey@epa.gov. (Federal Register 17 December 2021 [Rule] Pages 71574-71582).
Dec. 13, 2021
Catalyzing Clean Energy Industries and Jobs Through Federal Sustainability
December 8, 2021
President Biden has signed an Executive Order that demonstrates how the United States will leverage its scale and procurement power to lead by example in tackling the climate crisis. The executive order will reduce emissions across federal operations, invest in American clean energy industries and manufacturing, and create clean, healthy, and resilient communities.
Dec. 9, 2021
(12/08/2021) President Biden has signed an executive order that demonstrates how the United States will leverage its scale and procurement power to lead by example in tackling the climate crisis. The executive order will reduce emissions across federal operations, invest in American clean energy industries and manufacturing, and create clean, healthy, and resilient communities. The President is building on his whole-of-government effort to tackle the climate crisis in a way that creates well-paying jobs, grows industries, and makes the country more economically competitive.
Nov. 29, 2021
EPA is announcing legally mandated changes to the fee requirements under TSCA. TSCA directs EPA to adjust the fees every three years. Accordingly, an adjustment will go into effect on 1 January 2022, and will apply to all TSCA fees. In a separate action, in 2022, EPA plans to propose additional revisions to the 2018 TSCA fees rule to supplement the agency’s proposal from 11 January 2021 to ensure that TSCA fee amounts capture up to 25% of the actual costs of TSCA activities, fees are distributed equitably, and fee payers are identified through a transparent process.
Nov. 24, 2021
EPA and U.S. Department of the Army announced a proposed rule to re-establish the pre-2015 definition of "waters of the United States" (WOTUS) which had been in place for decades, updated to reflect consideration of Supreme Court decisions. This action advances the agencies' goal of establishing a durable definition of WOTUS that protects public health, the environment, and downstream communities while supporting economic opportunity, agriculture, and other industries that depend on clean water. This proposed rule would support a stable implementation of "waters of the United States" while the agencies continue to consult with states, Tribes, local governments, and a broad array of stakeholders in both the implementation of WOTUS and future regulatory actions. The proposed rule would maintain the longstanding exclusions of the pre-2015 regulations as well as the exemptions and exclusions in the Clean Water Act on which the agricultural community has come to rely.
Nov. 15, 2021
The EPA is issuing a technical amendment to modify the submission location for Continuous Release Reports. Reports are currently submitted to respective EPA regional offices; with this technical amendment, EPA will instead require all future such reports to be submitted to the appropriate EPA Headquarters (HQ) office. The Agency is also correcting a typographical spelling error, correcting citations within the section, and amending the listed authority. This final rule is effective on 12 November 2021. POC is Mark Douglas, EPA, Office of Emergency Management, (MC: 5104A), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460; 202-564-5572; douglas.mark@epa.gov. (Federal Register 12 November 2021 [Rule] Pages 62736-62737)
Oct. 27, 2021
EPA outlined plans to initiate the rulemaking process for two new actions under the hazardous waste law, reflecting the agency's focus on using best available science and leveraging authorities to combat this shared challenge. EPA is announcing the initiation of two rulemakings. First, the agency will initiate the process to propose adding four PFAS chemicals as RCRA Hazardous Constituents under Appendix VIII, by evaluating the existing data for these chemicals and establishing a record to support such a proposed rule. The four PFAS chemicals EPA will evaluate are: PFOA, PFOS, PFBS, and GenX. Adding these chemicals as RCRA Hazardous Constituents would ensure they are subject to corrective action requirements and would be a necessary building block for future work to regulate PFAS as a listed hazardous waste. The second rulemaking effort will clarify in our regulations that the RCRA Corrective Action Program has the authority to require investigation and cleanup for wastes that meet the statutory definition of hazardous waste, as defined under RCRA section 1004(5). This modification would clarify that emerging contaminants such as PFAS can be cleaned up through the RCRA corrective action process. These actions build on EPA's broader strategy to comprehensively address PFAS pollution across the country.
Oct. 1, 2021
EPA is making conforming changes to regulations related to twelve hazardous waste import-export recovery and disposal operations used in hazardous waste export and import notices submitted to EPA by U.S. exporters and importers, and in movement documents that accompany export and import shipments. The changes to regulations related to these twelve recovery and disposal operations are needed to reflect changes to regulations related to Canadian import-export recovery and disposal operations that Canada promulgated in the Canada Gazette Part II on 17 March 2021 and that become effective in Canada on 31 October 2021. Additionally, as the changes in the rule are being made solely to conform to Canada's regulatory changes to Canada-specific operation codes and descriptions, this is a final rulemaking and no public comment is being solicited. This rule is effective on 31 October 2021. POC is Laura Coughlan, Materials Recovery and Waste Management Division, Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery (5304P), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460; tele: (703) 308-0005; email: coughlan.laura@epa.gov. Click here for more.
Sep. 16, 2021
This notice announces issuance by all 10 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions of the final 2021 National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) pesticide general permit (PGP)--the 2021 PGP. The 2021 PGP, which has an effective date of 31 October 2021, replaces the existing permit (2016 PGP) that expires at midnight on 31 October 2021, and authorizes certain point source discharges from the application of pesticides to waters of the United States in accordance with the terms and conditions described therein. EPA is issuing this permit for five (5) years in all areas of the country where EPA is the NPDES permitting authority. For further information on the final permit, contact the appropriate EPA Regional office listed in the federal register. (Federal Register 16 September 2021 [Notice] Pages 51665-51669).
Sep. 9, 2021
EPA is soliciting information and requesting comments to assist in the potential development of regulations for pyrolysis and gasification units that are used to convert solid or semi-solid feedstocks, including solid waste (e.g., municipal solid waste, commercial and industrial waste, hospital/medical/infectious waste, sewage sludge, other solid waste), biomass, plastics, tires, and organic contaminants in soils and oily sludges to useful products such as energy, fuels and chemical commodities. Pyrolysis and gasification are often described as heat induced thermal decomposition processes. Through recent requests for applicability determinations, it appears that pyrolysis and gasification processes are more widely being used to convert waste into useful products or energy. Comments must be received on or before 8 November 2021. POC is Nabanita Modak Fischer, Fuels and Incineration Group, Sector Policies and Programs Division (E143-05), EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; tele: (919) 541-5572; email address: modak.nabanita@epa.gov. (Federal Register 8 September 2021 [Proposed Rules] Pages 50296-50303).
Sep. 2, 2021
The latest TSCA Inventory is now available. The TSCA Inventory is a list of all existing chemical substances manufactured, processed, or imported in the U.S. This biannual update to the public TSCA Inventory is part of EPA's regular posting of non-confidential TSCA Inventory data. The next regular update of the Inventory is planned for winter 2022. The Inventory contains 86,607 chemicals of which 41,953 are active in U.S commerce. Other updates to the TSCA Inventory include new chemical substance additions, commercial activity data and regulatory flags, such as polymer exemptions, TSCA section 4 test orders and TSCA section 5 significant new use rules (SNURs).
Aug. 25, 2021
This August 2021 edition of The Corps Environment highlights considering the environment when employing a risk management and systems approach, in support of Environmental Operating Principle #5. Content includes commentary from Mr. Richard Kidd, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Environment and Energy Resilience), and highlights initiatives across the Army environmental community. Content includes:
  • U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) discusses their formation of a tiger team to tackle climate change
  • U.S. Army Environmental Command highlights how the Army's commitment to endangered species is enhancing training lands
  • USACE Far East District shares how they are leading biodiversity efforts for American forces in Korea
  • USACE Omaha District discusses how they are leveraging an innovative approach to clean up and restore a formerly used defense site
  • ERDC highlights how USACE and its partners received an international award for the Tyndall Coastal Resilience Study.
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